India Mulls End to Press Isolation Calls for Liberalization and Cultural Purity Collide in Debate over Western Access to the Indian Media

By Tony Spaeth, | The Christian Science Monitor, April 2, 1994 | Go to article overview

India Mulls End to Press Isolation Calls for Liberalization and Cultural Purity Collide in Debate over Western Access to the Indian Media


Tony Spaeth,, The Christian Science Monitor


INDIA may allow foreign newspapers and magazines to start printing within its borders after a 38-year ban. But the issue has generated plenty of controversy, demonstrating that each step of the country's ongoing economic liberalization is difficult.

Two former justices of the Indian Supreme Court and a former prime minister have warned of dire consequences if foreign publications are invited in. In February, three separate Indian courts gave temporary orders forbidding the government from registering them. Academics, lawyers, editorialists - and not a few local newspaper and magazine owners - are warning of an imminent cultural invasion. "I feel it's a disaster in the making," says Richard Crasta, a novelist. "It's a complete, spineless cave-in to the West."

On the other side are people like Aveek Sarkar, a prominent Calcutta-based publisher who wants to start a financial newspaper in partnership with the Financial Times of London. Mr. Sarkar says the naysayers are people who simply refuse to catch up with the times. "If you did a survey five years back, all Indians would have said the earth is flat. If you took a survey now, a whole lot of people would still say the earth was flat. India is a Rip van Winkle society."

At issue is a national media policy made in 1955 and 1956 that prohibits foreign publications from operating in India and foreign news agencies from selling their reports directly to Indian subscribers. The policy had the dual goal of shielding domestic news organizations from foreign competition and guarding the newly independent nation from Western biases in news coverage. In 1956 and again in 1960, the government amended an 1867 press law to give itself the power to regulate who could print in India and who could not.

Today, the government is being asked to loosen those rules. At least three foreign publications have formally requested permission to start joint ventures with Indian partners. The Financial Times wants to publish a financial newspaper with Sarkar's Ananda Bazar Patrika group; Time-Warner Inc. has proposed a joint venture with Living Media India Ltd., the publishers of India Today magazine, which would print Time Magazine locally; and Cable News Network is seeking a deal with Indian state TV.

In addition, two foreign news agencies have requested permission to distribute their services directly.

The decision rests with the government of Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao, which since 1991 has done more to liberalize the Indian economy than any previous government. But the decision has been slow in coming - Time applied for its joint- venture registration in 1991 - and there are mixed signals as to how it will go. Finance Minister Manmohan Singh, the prime force behind the liberalization drive, is said to be in favor. But in late February, the government filed an affidavit in the Delhi High Court saying it stood by the former policy barring the foreign media.

The decision has become a kind of touchstone for India's liberalization program: Is it a mere retinkering with the rules? …

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India Mulls End to Press Isolation Calls for Liberalization and Cultural Purity Collide in Debate over Western Access to the Indian Media
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