Scientists Seek Free Trade Agreement for `Eggheads' Group Wants Computer Networks to Share Information across Borders

By David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 27, 1994 | Go to article overview

Scientists Seek Free Trade Agreement for `Eggheads' Group Wants Computer Networks to Share Information across Borders


David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


PAST a new electron microscope, a spectrophotometer, and sundry laboratory equipment, you will find Antonio Pena Diaz squeezed into an office not much bigger than a closet.

One of Mexico's leading microbiologists and past president of the Mexican Academy of Scientific Research (he stepped down in February), Dr. Pena is catching up on some electronic mail from a doctoral student in the United States. And he's brainstorming about what might be dubbed a "hemispheric free-trade agreement for eggheads."

Scientists figure that if the industrialists in gray suits can pull off a North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), so can the lab boys in the white coats.

"We're in a period where the economic borders are disappearing. Why not the scientific borders?" asks Pena, director of the Institute of Cellular Physiology at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

"Instead of duplicating efforts, we should be cooperating across borders and getting better use of limited resources. The idea is to foster an environment for collaboration throughout the hemisphere," he says.

Pena is co-chairman of a group of scientists from 11 nations advocating what's known as the Western Hemisphere Science Collaboration Initiative.

The initiative calls for creating better communication and cooperation by setting up computer networks to exchange information. It wants to encourage governments and international institutions to provide scholarship money and fund collaborative research efforts that draw on the expertise of several nations. The long-term goal is to set up a Pan American Research Foundation.

This is not a scheme by underfunded Latin American scientists to grab funds and ideas from supposedly "rich" northern neighbors, Pena says. US and Canadian scientists are also advocates of the initiative. And Organization of American States and United Nations representatives are on the steering committee.

"In many Latin American nations, there are world-class scientists in specific fields. Of course, you won't find excellence in every discipline, in every country," says Francisco Ayala, president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a genetics researcher at the University of California, Irvine.

There are also sound economic reasons for the initiative. Dr. Ayala says there's a tendency for Latin American graduate students to automatically go to the US or Canada, without realizing a top scientist and program exist in a neighboring country. "It's easier and cheaper for a student to go from Bogata to Caracas than to the US," he says.

The subject of the group's first collaborative effort will be biodiversity. A hemispherewide conference is planned for late June in Manaus, Brazil. Pena says he'd rather be focusing on basic science. But other topics are more easily funded. "Biodiversity is a topic with a lot of activity now in various countries," Ayala says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Scientists Seek Free Trade Agreement for `Eggheads' Group Wants Computer Networks to Share Information across Borders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.