Baseball Tries on a New Cap Limits on How Much Players Are Paid May Level the Field for All Teams

By Mark Trumbull, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 2, 1994 | Go to article overview

Baseball Tries on a New Cap Limits on How Much Players Are Paid May Level the Field for All Teams


Mark Trumbull, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


AS Ken Griffey Jr. tags a pitch for his 15th home run of the season, the crowd roars and fireworks patter under the Kingdome roof.

The star center fielder, who leads the league in homers, wields one of several sizzling bats on the Seattle Mariners. But pyrotechnics are notably absent from the club's financial scorecard: The baseball franchise says it lost about $15 million last year and expects to be $10 million in the red this season.

While many of the 28 teams in Major League Baseball are making money, other teams - estimates range from half to one-fourth - are not. Explanations range from poor management to the disparity in TV revenues between big-city teams and those in smaller cities. Owners say one factor is central: skyrocketing player salaries.

Mr. Griffey's 1994 contract of $5 million makes him the game's highest-paid center fielder. In an effort to erase red ink while making a bid for the Mariners' first division championship, Mariner vice president Woody Woodward walked a tightrope earlier this year. He retained a handful of big-name players with multimillion-dollar contracts but cut the team's payroll to $29 million, from $33 million in '93. Even so, salaries devour two-thirds of the club's revenue.

At the other end of the spectrum are a few teams like the Toronto Blue Jays, with payrolls 50 percent higher than Seattle's.

With teams bidding for top players in an effort to win pennants and fans, owners say a cap on team payrolls is needed to restore discipline and profits to the game. Basketball teams have had salary caps for about a decade, and the National Football League is operating under a new system that limits salaries to no more than 64 percent of revenues. In both sports, the lion's share of industry revenues are shared so that teams are on a fairly level playing field, economically.

This year, baseball owners are trying to renegotiate the collective-bargaining agreement that governs player contracts, hoping to introduce payroll limits. If players agree to the caps, owners will share more of their television revenue. Currently only the revenue from national telecasts is fully pooled in baseball, with local broadcast and cable coverage giving big-city teams a financial edge. The disparity is increasing this year, because national broadcast income is being cut in half under a new contract with the ABC and NBC networks.

Despite what owners argue are the game's dire straits, salary caps are hardly a foregone conclusion. Foremost among the obstacles is heavy resistance from the players union. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Baseball Tries on a New Cap Limits on How Much Players Are Paid May Level the Field for All Teams
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.