Art and Objects from the Land of Genghis Khan A Joint US-China Exhibition Offers a Rare Look at Mongol Treasure , PHOTOS COURTESY OF NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY/COLLECTION OF CHIFENG MUNICIPAL MUSEUM; 2)ROYAL TRAPPINGS: Front Arch Decoration from a Set of Six Gold Facings for a Saddle. Mongol Period (1200 to 1400 AD).; 3) HEADGEAR: Headdress from the Warring States Era (475 to 221 BC) Made of Hammered Gold and Turquoise., HERE AND AT LEFT, COLLECTION OF INNER MONGOLIA MUSEUM, HUHEHAOTE

By Marlena Donahue, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 25, 1994 | Go to article overview

Art and Objects from the Land of Genghis Khan A Joint US-China Exhibition Offers a Rare Look at Mongol Treasure , PHOTOS COURTESY OF NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY/COLLECTION OF CHIFENG MUNICIPAL MUSEUM; 2)ROYAL TRAPPINGS: Front Arch Decoration from a Set of Six Gold Facings for a Saddle. Mongol Period (1200 to 1400 AD).; 3) HEADGEAR: Headdress from the Warring States Era (475 to 221 BC) Made of Hammered Gold and Turquoise., HERE AND AT LEFT, COLLECTION OF INNER MONGOLIA MUSEUM, HUHEHAOTE


Marlena Donahue, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


PERHAPS more than any other name in history, Genghis Khan holds the popular imagination. The Mongolian leader calls up pictures of "barbarians" on horseback conquering chunks of Eastern Europe and Asia around the 13th century.

An extraordinary exhibition, "Genghis Khan: Treasures From Inner Mongolia," surveys not just Genghis's art and times, but also the entire heritage of Khan spanning 3,500 years of Mongolian culture, beginning in 3000 BC and continuing to the era of the celebrated ruler.

This informative endeavor, which brings to light the mythical and historical Khan, opened its national tour early in March at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and is due to travel to New York and British Columbia.

The show represents a cultural-exchange coup for the United States: A partnership was developed between the Los Angeles museum and the People's Republic of China - where a large number of Mongolian artifacts are preserved.

The Mongols, like most migratory tribes, are thought to have originated near Turkey. They began a mass migration to find food in 1000 BC. As a mobile culture, artifacts were small, war-related, and so tended to become lost. When the Mongols ruled and settled in China from 1200 to 1300, their art and artifacts came to be concentrated around that area. While China was closed to the West, so too was much information on this fascinating civilization.

The exhibition reveals a remarkable cache of objects ranging from early Chinese-influenced pottery, to gold earrings that belonged to Mongol nobility, to solid gold saddle ornaments, and beautifully tooled daggers. History comes alive as visitors walk through the galleries that paint a picture of the mythologized Khan.

By the time of Genghis, the Mongols controlled large parts of Russia, Poland, Palestine, and Japan. The Khan's armies spread from Hungary through most of Asia and conquered an empire wider than that of Alexander the Great.

Many of the finest pieces on display were discovered only in the last few years and have remained unexhibited outside Asia. The opening of channels between China and Western scholars led to the five years of East-West planning and communication and historical research behind this major art event.

Genghis Khan came to power through his father, leader of the Mongol tribes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Art and Objects from the Land of Genghis Khan A Joint US-China Exhibition Offers a Rare Look at Mongol Treasure , PHOTOS COURTESY OF NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY/COLLECTION OF CHIFENG MUNICIPAL MUSEUM; 2)ROYAL TRAPPINGS: Front Arch Decoration from a Set of Six Gold Facings for a Saddle. Mongol Period (1200 to 1400 AD).; 3) HEADGEAR: Headdress from the Warring States Era (475 to 221 BC) Made of Hammered Gold and Turquoise., HERE AND AT LEFT, COLLECTION OF INNER MONGOLIA MUSEUM, HUHEHAOTE
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.