Russian Organized Crime Infiltrates Economy, Threatens Foreign Investment

By Wendy Sloane, | The Christian Science Monitor, June 14, 1994 | Go to article overview

Russian Organized Crime Infiltrates Economy, Threatens Foreign Investment


Wendy Sloane,, The Christian Science Monitor


BUSINESSMAN Boris Berezovsky almost became a statistic last week - yet another victim of the gangland-style killings threatening to become a daily fixture of Russia's increasingly violent criminal underworld.

Mr. Berezovsky, head of the giant LogoVAZ car distributor and a leader of the All-Russia Automobile Alliance (AVVA) was sitting in his limousine in rush-hour traffic last Tuesday when a car bomb exploded. Police say the powerful, professionally made device was triggered by remote control.

The incident appeared to be yet another failed contract murder. But there are indications that the attack could also have implications for United States businesses operating in Russia. Russian sources say the bombing could have been an attempt by organized crime rings, which have a strong interest in sales of used - and often stolen - foreign cars, to block AVVA's plans with the US firm General Motors Corporation (GM) to fund a privately financed joint venture to manufacture cars in Togliatti.

Organized crime, stemming from long-entrenched bribery and corruption, has flourished since the Soviet state dissolved. Some reports say rival gangs vying for position in Russia's fledgling market economy have carved up the capital into as many as 10 spheres of influence, which are completely under their control. The police, many of whom are corrupt themselves, are largely powerless to cope with the problem. Consequently, politicians such as ultranationalist Vladimir Zhirinovsky advocate shooting all suspected criminals on sight.

Russia's "mafia" now runs many key businesses, not only shady operations such as prostitution and drug-dealing, but also legitimate enterprises from the tiniest street kiosk to the most influential bank. Some Western observers have warned that Russian gangsters have even gained access to nuclear technology, which they could use for international blackmail. Police revealed last week that in March they had detained three men with seven pounds of highly enriched uranium stolen from a top-secret Russian plant, but officials said the substance was not enriched to a sufficient degree to make nuclear weapons.

Violence has become so intrusive that many Muscovites carry guns to protect themselves. Kidnapping and hostage-taking occur almost daily. Police say crimes involving firearms or explosives have risen 45 percent in the first five months of this year compared with the same period last year, and organized rings are threatening to become the largest impediment to both Russia's political stability and the future of President Boris Yeltsin's economic reforms.

Last week, Mr. Yeltsin unveiled several new measures to combat organized crime, which he has called his top priority. On Friday, he told a Kremlin news conference that he had ordered his security forces to cleanse the "criminal filth" from the country. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Russian Organized Crime Infiltrates Economy, Threatens Foreign Investment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.