As Economy Grows, So Too the Business of Consulting WANT

By Junko Fujita, | The Christian Science Monitor, August 5, 1994 | Go to article overview

As Economy Grows, So Too the Business of Consulting WANT


Junko Fujita,, The Christian Science Monitor


ILKE thousands of other Americans, Chris Christensen lost his job two years ago as a manager of a military aerospace contractor. In a year and a half, he sent out 750 resumes - all without a positive response. He finally decided to start his own management consulting business.

"The only way I can do what I know how to do is to be a consultant," says the 55-year-old Mr. Christensen. He converted a guest room in his condominium on the outskirts of Los Angeles into an office, obtained lists of businesspeople from the local library, and plied the phone lines offering his services.

A year later, Christensen is still living off his retirement money. He says he expects it to take another year for his business to become profitable.

The number of independent consultants such as Christensen is booming. Business is hungry for their expertise, new courses to hone consulting skills have full rosters, and unemployed middle managers see a future in the field.

The Wharton Small Business Development Center, an affiliate of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, offers a three-year-old course on the "art" of successful consulting, which attracts about 60 students a year. Clark Callahan, assistant director of the development center, says the course is aimed at high-skilled people who have been laid off and want to go into consulting.

Instructor William Dorman says most of his students are highly qualified, with at least 10 years experience.

As the United States economy begins to pick up, these laid-off workers are being contracted back as consultants by the same companies that trimmed staff through the lean years of the recession.

The growth of the industry "collates with the strong growth of the economy," says Patrick Byrne, vice president and managing director of North American operations at A. T. Kearney Inc., a Chicago-based management consultancy. As companies downsize and lay off large numbers of white-collar workers, they need management help, Mr. Byrne says.

David Lord, editor of Consultants News, an industry publication based in Fitzwilliam, N.H., adds: "Corporations are seeking to control their costs and improve performance. At the same time, {they want to} reduce the cost of their own personnel and resources. In a competitive economy, they seek experts who have knowledge of similar situations."

"The biggest single value of the consultants is `fresh thinking,' " says Alex Shibanoff, an independent consultant and the director of the Consultants Bureau in Brunswick, N. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

As Economy Grows, So Too the Business of Consulting WANT
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.