An Urgent Agenda for the Cairo Conference Population Growth Underlies the Widening Gap between Industrialized Nations and the Third World

By Pat M. Holt. Pat M. Holt, former chief of of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, writes on foreign affairs from Washington. | The Christian Science Monitor, September 1, 1994 | Go to article overview

An Urgent Agenda for the Cairo Conference Population Growth Underlies the Widening Gap between Industrialized Nations and the Third World


Pat M. Holt. Pat M. Holt, former chief of of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, writes on foreign affairs from Washington., The Christian Science Monitor


IT took hundreds of thousands of years, from the origin of the species until 1800, for the world's population to reach 1 billion people. It took only 130 years, to 1930, to double that number and reach 2 billion. Now the total has grown to 5.7 billion, and another billion are being added every 12 years.

This rate of growth cannot be sustained. The pressure of people on resources is already reducing living standards in much of the world and is causing environmental degradation that will lead to further declines.

So what do we do about it?

To look for some answers, the United Nations is holding another of its periodic world population conferences in Cairo next week. The prospects for constructive action are bleak. Perhaps no other problem with such a great potential for disaster impinges on so many strongly held beliefs that inhibit rational analysis.

Underlying a good many of these beliefs is the mistaken notion that more is better. A nation or a city with many people is thought to be stronger and worthy of more respect than one with few people. If each individual is to be cherished as uniquely valuable, then individuals en masse are held to be even more valuable.

People are indeed a community's most valuable assets, but only if the community has invested enough in the people to make them productive. No other species has such a long period of maturation during which its young must be cared for - housed, clothed, fed, educated. It is a process that takes a minimum of 18 years from birth through secondary education and as much as 30 years for those who complete college and advanced technical and scientific training. This costs tens of thousands, in some cases hundreds of thousands of dollars for each one.

The more people you have, the less you can afford to make investments that would turn them into productive citizens. And so a vicious downward spiral begins. With each person less productive, you need more people to produce the same amount. Since they are not producing much more than subsistence anyway, everyone gets locked into deepening poverty. There is never a surplus for more schools or better housing and health care.

This is the root cause of the widening gap between the industrialized countries and the third world. It is what foreign-aid programs have spent hundreds of billions of dollars trying to rectify, mostly to no avail. …

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