Indian Dance Troupe Transforms the Traditional into the Modern

By Monitor, Karen Campbell | The Christian Science Monitor, September 8, 1994 | Go to article overview

Indian Dance Troupe Transforms the Traditional into the Modern


Monitor, Karen Campbell, The Christian Science Monitor


I NDIAN modern dance may seem like an oxymoron. But for a country as steeped in centuries-old traditions as India, the rebellious choreographer Chandralekha embodies modern dance. After a successful career as a classical dancer in the 1960s, the Madras-based choreographer abandoned the traditional Bharatanatyam for an intriguing, captivating synthesis of classical dance, yoga, and martial arts. Chandralekha's choreographic style pares traditional dance down to its essentials, and though she uses a fairly recognizable vocabulary, she puts it to the service of her own expressive purposes, shunning narrative for sheer physicality. Gone are most of the idiom's ornamental flourishes and esoteric religious symbols, leaving a style of movement that is almost spartan in its rigor and clarity. Conceptually, Chandralekha tends to address issues of the present, and she is considered one of the most importan t voices in the Indian counterculture. Chandralekha's excellent seven-member company, the Chandralekha Group, made its United States debut at Jacob's Pillow in Becket, Mass., on Aug. 26 as part of a tour that includes New York. The choreographer's new work, the 90-minute "Yantra," was given three performances accompanied by two superb Indian percussionists and vocalist Aruna Sayeeram. After a stunning vocal prologue by Sayeeram, the silver-haired Chandralekha opened the work with the recitation of a text that expressed its perspective of beauty as seen through geometrical relationships. She calls it "an homage to energies and the visual power of the triangle," and in fact, the triangle is everywhere in "Yantra" - a large black and red geometric backdrop, floor patterns of both dancers and the musicians, three lunging dancers with arms outstretched to form the apex of a pyramid. And though there are seven dancers in the full ensemble, it is a core group of three that are given the most expressive intensity. T HE first visual image is of three women sitting on a dimly lit stage, in a line front to back. Ever so slowly, they begin to move like some multiheaded, multilimbed deity, a personification of the image many Westerners have of Indian religion. …

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