Satisfying Marriages

The Christian Science Monitor, October 19, 1994 | Go to article overview

Satisfying Marriages


IT'S hardly a secret that in the world of TV soap operas and Hollywood movies make-believe marital infidelity is nearly as common as make-believe murder and mayhem.

Alas, real-life lapses in good judgment occur too. Charges concerning both the Prince and Princess of Wales have helped write a sad chapter of a storybook royal marriage. A recent book and TV special about President Franklin Roosevelt paints a complex picture of his relationship with Eleanor - a productive and supportive partnership in many ways, but frankly including infidelity as well. Other examples are disturbingly easily to cite.

Which leaves many of us wondering how much all this seemingly pervasive moral turpitude is affecting ordinary Americans. The hopeful answer from a new survey is: not much.

A careful study conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago released Oct. 7 found that 85 percent of wives and 75 percent of husbands have been completely faithful to their spouses over the course of their marriages.

This finding of overwhelming marital fidelity is considered more authoritative than earlier surveys, such as magazine polls, which depicted America as well on the way to becoming a modern Sodom and Gomorrah. …

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