Retailing 2005: Electronic Malls, Virtual Shopping Carts

By Laurent Belsie, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 15, 1994 | Go to article overview

Retailing 2005: Electronic Malls, Virtual Shopping Carts


Laurent Belsie, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


TODAY'S Christmas rush at the mall will become tomorrow's on-line stampede.

Buyers will order more goods remotely: from catalogs, home-shopping television shows, and on-line computer services. They'll visit stores proportionately less. It amounts to a significant change in the retail industry. If it happens quickly enough, it will be a revolution.

Michael Killen, president of his own market-research firm in Palo Alto, Calif., believes in revolutions. This year, he estimates that the world has spent roughly $4.6 trillion buying goods and services. Nearly nine times out of 10, people and businesses bought these things in the traditional, face-to-face manner. That's why today's malls and retail stores are doing a booming business, and newfangled on-line shopping services are not.

But don't grab for that shopping cart. By 2000, Mr. Killen says, more than one-quarter of consumer shopping will be conducted remotely; by the year 2005, one-third will be.

Many retail analysts agree a transition, albeit a slower one, is under way. "I wouldn't sound the death knell of retailing right now," says Maxwell Sroge, a catalog consultant based in Evanston, Ill. But "when on-line shopping becomes available ... it's going to have tremendous impact on the nonstore marketing business."

Retailers, catalog companies, on-line providers, and telephone companies all seem to agree.

Many are lining up for Killen's report on electronic commerce, which is due out in a couple of weeks. Meanwhile, they are announcing a raft of new experiments.

For example:

* Next month, MCI Communications Corporation in Washington will offer an on-line shopping service called marketplaceMCI. Running on the Internet, a worldwide web of computer networks, the service will allow shoppers to use a computer to push a virtual shopping cart through an electronic mall. They'll be able to buy a toy for Junior and select bed linens from their home computer. Purchases, made by credit card, will be secured using special encryption technology.

* Three weeks ago, America Online launched its own shopping service - 2Market - in partnership with Apple Computer Inc., in Cupertino, Calif., and Medior, a software firm. The service allows shoppers to view offerings on-line or on a CD-ROM catalog. (CD-ROMs are similar to audio compact discs and carry computer-readable sound, video, and text.) Cutting-edge retailers, such as Lands' End and The Sharper Image, have already jumped on board.

* Several cable-television companies are also jumping on the on-line bandwagon. Time Warner Inc., in New York City, plans to deliver marketing brochures to the home via a printer that sits on top of the TV set. QVC plans an on-line service called Q-Online. Comcast Cable Communications in Philadelphia is reportedly considering offering shopping among its upcoming introduction of Internet service via TV. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Retailing 2005: Electronic Malls, Virtual Shopping Carts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.