Highjacking Shows France, Algeria Can't Contain Islam ISLAMIST INSURGENCY

By Gail Rusell Chaddock, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 27, 1994 | Go to article overview

Highjacking Shows France, Algeria Can't Contain Islam ISLAMIST INSURGENCY


Gail Rusell Chaddock, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE hijacking of an Air France airliner on a runway in Algiers last weekend did what two months of intensified violence had failed to do - put Algeria's civil conflict back on the front pages in France.

The incident challenges both the Algerian government - which, despite a two-month campaign to crush the Islamist insurgency, failed to protect the airport - and France's policy to support that government.

The hijackers seized the Airbus and 172 passengers and crew members Saturday. Algerian news reports say they called for the release of two leaders of the banned Islamic Salvation Front (FIS) and demanded to leave Algeria.

French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe and Interior Minister Charles Pasqua intervened with their counterparts in the Algerian government to "call their attention to the seriousness of the ultimatum" to kill French hostages. At presstime, in an apparent rescue attempt, French elite forces stormed the plane. They now have control of the plane, but several people were killed, including the hijackers. Undermining relations

For Ali, an Algerian who took the earlier Air France morning flight out of Algiers, the message of the hijackers is clear: "They want to undermine relations between France and Algeria."

This impression Foreign Minister Juppe hastened to correct: "I don't think it's wise to envisage the rupture of ties between France and Algeria, because we have a long history, geography, as well as longstanding interests in common."

For 130 years of colonial history, France viewed Algeria as a "safety valve" for its own social woes: Many of France's unemployed, for example, emigrated to start a new life in French Algeria. Today, with 50 percent of the Algerian population under the age of 20, with little hope for employment, housing, or a letup in violence, many French fear that their own country will see a flood of immigrants and take on Algeria's woes.

* Last month, French police rounded up 80 Algerians around Paris suspected of trafficking arms and false identifications to Islamic militants in Algeria.

* Two weeks ago, a communique circulating under the name of a leader of the FIS claimed that "After Jan 1, 1995, suicide attacks will be carried out against diplomatic missions and French interests throughout the Arab world."

* Unprecedented levels of gang violence in the impoverished French suburbs are linked to "rage" of displaced, disaffected second- and third-generation Algerians. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Highjacking Shows France, Algeria Can't Contain Islam ISLAMIST INSURGENCY
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.