Grass-Roots Movement

The Christian Science Monitor, March 9, 1995 | Go to article overview

Grass-Roots Movement


THE practice of primitive Christianity was, and is, a grass-roots movement of ordinary people doing remarkable things through the healing power of prayer. Christ Jesus, the founder of Christianity, was a carpenter. His first disciples were fishermen. The men and women who followed his teachings came from many races and nations, and many occupations. They were united through prayer, and healed through prayer.

Today, ordinary people around the world are praying and healing through prayer. They are normal folk doing remarkable things without public acclaim because they love and trust God. Are you one of these people who are trying to follow Christ Jesus? You can be!

Mary Baker Eddy discovered the Science underlying Jesus' teachings and his marvelous healing works. She wrote a book, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, that sheds new light on the Bible and on how prayer brings healing. The first chapter in the book, "Prayer," opens by turning us immediately to God: "The prayer that reforms the sinner and heals the sick is an absolute faith that all things are possible to God,--a spiritual understanding of Him, an unselfed love" (p. 1). Christ Jesus' efforts make plain that God, divine Love, is the healing power. "I can of mine own self do nothing," he said in John's Gospel (5:30). And elsewhere in John he plainly told us, "The Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works" (14:10).

What makes Jesus' example of God-empowered healing a truly "grass-roots" movement is the simple fact that you and I are children of the same Father. God, divine Spirit, created us in His image; we are wholly spiritual. When we pray with the spirit of God's love in our hearts as Jesus prayed, we too are able to heal through understanding God.

The grass-roots movement of healing prayer, started by Jesus, brings us freedom from materiality--freedom from sin, from disease, from death. When we join as freedom fighters, we don't fight with weapons of destruction. We save people by helping to bring to light a more abundant sense of life in God, who is Life. …

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