Antitrust Laws Are a Bedrock of Competition

The Christian Science Monitor, March 3, 1995 | Go to article overview

Antitrust Laws Are a Bedrock of Competition


Despite the 100-year record of antitrust laws promoting entrepreneurial activity, holding down industry concentration, and compelling price competition, the author of the opinion-page article "Antitrust Laws Need Regulatory Reform," March 24, seeks to gut these laws because he disagrees with a particular case. He points out that industry concentration has not grown in the last 25 years. Has he considered that such has not happened because of antitrust enforcement? He decries efforts to stop Microsoft's monopolistic practices, but fails to note that the breakup of AT&T by the Justice Department led to eight healthy companies (whose creative energy is ensuring the United States' technological lead), instead of one monopoly with no incentive to innovate.

The Sherman Act is a bedrock of our free institutions. It has helped ensure a climate of commercial innovation, competitive prices for consumers, and fairness for all.

Charles G. Brown, Alexandria, Va.

Former chair Antitrust Committee of the National Association of Attorneys General

This article was right on target.

Our government actively supports monopoly situations in agriculture and other areas to the proven financial detriment of the public. Attempting to control Microsoft is not only detrimental to the best interest of the consumer, but it severely affects the competitive position of the US in the world market.

When are those people in Washington going to realize that they are not all-knowing?

Donald Bradley, Plainfield, N.H.

Day care: You get what you pay for

As a father of a 2-1/2 year old and the husband of a professional woman who now works at home taking care of our son, I found disturbing the travails of finding high-quality day care ("Who'll Look After Little Clara?" March 27). In short, most couples who want "high quality" day care are simply too cheap to pay for it.

In the Washington metropolitan area, a very expensive region, day care for young children is available at rates as low as $75 a week, or $3,750 a year for 50 weeks. Keep in mind that if a caregiver has three infants at that rate, that comes only to $5. …

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