Critic Wilson Held High Intellectual, but Not Personal Standards

By Merle Rubin. Merle Rubin regularly reviews books | The Christian Science Monitor, June 13, 1995 | Go to article overview

Critic Wilson Held High Intellectual, but Not Personal Standards


Merle Rubin. Merle Rubin regularly reviews books, The Christian Science Monitor


EDMUND WILSON: A BIOGRAPHY

By Jeffrey Meyers

Houghton Mifflin

A Peter Davison Book

554 pp.,.$35

EGREGIOUSLY erudite, staunchly independent, and always eager to explore new realms of knowledge and experience, Edmund Wilson (1895-1972) may well be considered the most influential American critic of the century.

When the New Yorker took him on as its weekly book columnist in 1943, the redoubtable H.L. Mencken congratulated the magazine's editor, Harold Ross, on his wise choice: "'You have found a highly competent critic and a perfectly honest man. The combination is not too common in this great Republic.'"

Writing for journals like The New Republic, The New Yorker, and later The New York Review of Books (he disdained the New York Times Book Review as middle-brow), Wilson considered himself not to be writing for academic specialists, but for a reading public whose intelligence he not only presumed but helped to cultivate.

His groundbreaking essays on Yeats, Joyce, Proust, Valery, and T.S. Eliot, collected in his book "Axel's Castle" (1931), were instrumental in bringing these authors to the attention of the general reader. As Jeffrey Meyers points out in this, the first full-scale biography of Wilson, even a well-educated woman like Diana Trilling, two years out of Radcliffe in 1929, "had not yet heard of Proust or Yeats or T.S. Eliot."

Wilson was also among the first to commend - and subsequently to criticize - Hemingway, praising the pared-down prose and powerful moral vision of his early work, while pointing out elements of self-parody and self-aggrandizement that marred some of his later writing. Wilson championed the merits of Dickens and Kipling when both had fallen from critical esteem, and he befriended and sponsored a still-struggling Vladimir Nabokov - with whom he would later carry on a protracted literary feud.

On the socio-political front, Wilson generally supported the underdog, from the Harlan County coal miners in the 1930s to the Iroquois Indians threatened with displacement by the New York State Power Authority in 1959. His uncanny ability to comprehend and clearly communicate the complexities of a literary work or a real-life situation stood him in good stead when he investigated the fascinating story of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the controversies surrounding them.

As Meyers's well-researched and readable biography reminds, Wilson had hopes of becoming a creative as well as critical force in American letters. At Princeton, he was a classmate of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Meyers, author of a biography of Fitzgerald (as well as one of Hemingway), notes the ironies of their relationship:

The frivolous Fitzgerald was awed by Wilson's superior learning and acuity, while Wilson alternately envied and mistrusted his friend's use and abuse of his creative gifts. Ultimately, Wilson's brilliant editing of Fitzgerald's posthumous works, "The Crack-Up" and "The Last Tycoon," went a long way toward restoring and enhancing Fitzgerald's literary standing. Over the years, Wilson tried his hand at creative writing, turning out a number of concept-heavy plays and a steady stream of rather lumbering rhymed verse that Meyers quotes to good effect. …

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