TV Violence in Britain Faces Code of 'Decency'

By Alexander MacLeod, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 19, 1995 | Go to article overview

TV Violence in Britain Faces Code of 'Decency'


Alexander MacLeod, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


HAVING turned television into high art through such programs as Masterpiece Theater, Britain has also made progress in scrubbing its airwaves of scenes depicting violence. But not enough to satisfy critics and government officials seeking new ways to stem TV mayhem. And it could be that the Ninja Turtles and Power Rangers have met their match in the British Cabinet minister who oversees broadcasting, Virginia Bottomley. She is likely by early next year to insist on "taste and decency" standards for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and British commercial channels, according to her officials. A recent survey found programs showing "an intention to harm or to intimidate" characters portrayed on TV - many of the shows imported from America - have been cut nearly in half over nearly the past decade. Researchers at Sheffield University near Manchester found that violence on Britain's four terrestrial TV channels had fallen from 1.1 percent of all content nine years ago to 0.62 percent today, based on analysis of 4,715 hours of programs over six months. Despite the progress, points out Cabinet minister Bottomley, 37 percent of programs still contain some violence, with 19 percent of it in children's shows. In the programs containing violence, the report says, there were 21,000 separate violent acts depicted in 10,000 sequences. Violent scenes were twice as common on satellite channels than on terrestrial channels. Satellite TV is steadily becoming more popular in Britain as media magnate Rupert Murdoch succeeds in persuading more and more homes to install receiving dishes for his British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB) programs. Violence on British TV is hotly debated by broadcasters and citizens' groups. They frequently find themselves at odds over how much violence there is on television and what effect it has on viewers - particularly the very young. Two years ago the issue received huge attention when it was revealed that two children who had beaten to death a toddler and left his body on a railway track had been watching a video showing similar scenes only a short time earlier. While Bottomley is expected to go on the offensive against violence on the BBC and Britain's terrestrial channels, it is less clear how she is going to persuade BSkyB to cut back on violence in its transmissions. The company is headquartered outside Britain and is not subject to British broadcasting legislation. "The government takes very seriously public concern about the portrayal of violence on our TV screens," Bottomley said last month. "Broadcasting is a powerful medium with potential to do great good, but we must be vigilant against its negative influence." The Sheffield research - the most detailed survey in recent years - was commissioned jointly by the BBC and the Independent Television Commission, which regulates terrestrial commercial TV channels. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

TV Violence in Britain Faces Code of 'Decency'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.