Airlines Scurry to 'Wire Up' Laurent Belsie

The Christian Science Monitor, September 19, 1995 | Go to article overview

Airlines Scurry to 'Wire Up' Laurent Belsie


Passengers may soon find a communications center right at their seat It used to be that you got away from it all when you left the office. Then technology changed, and the home became an office. So you drove around to get away from it all, until the car phone and the portable computer. Then you hopped a plane. Oh sure, there were those airline phones. For what it cost to dine at a fancy French restaurant you could mumble hello to the kids from 30,000 feet. But even the family didn't expect that kind of treatment. And anyway, no one could reach you for a few blessed hours. But those days of flying freedom are numbered. Major airlines are scrambling to wire up the airplane seat. Games, movies-on-demand, communications gear - you name it - are being crammed in somewhere between the seat back and the flight-attendant call button. This is progress, I suppose. But I keep wondering if people want to be "wired" to their airline seat. It seems constricting, somehow, like having a seat belt pulled a little too tight. Several airlines are conducting trials. British Airways is scheduled to outfit a Boeing 747 with an interactive entertainment system in late December. Singapore Airlines has three 747s equipped with personal entertainment on board. Then there's United Airlines. United is the first airline to fly the all-new Boeing 777. This plane is built from the ground up with the idea that passengers deserve to be wired up. United's new entertainment system, built by GEC-Marconi, offers a bevy of choices. Passengers can: *Pick from two movie channels. They're displayed on a 5-1/4-inch screen, one to a passenger. In coach class, the screens are embedded into the back of the seat ahead of you, just above the tray table. In first class, they're stored in the armrest, ready to pop out at a comfortable viewing angle. *View news and entertainment shows on six other channels. *Choose from 20 audio channels - which isn't much different from other airplanes except that the sound is digital, with the clarity of an audio CD. This is just the beginning. When GEC-Marconi works out the bugs in its system, United passengers will be able to play up to 50 video games on the screen. They'll each have a telephone, cradled in the armrest, which they can program to receive calls from the ground. If calling Des Moines from Row 12 is unappealing, how about talking to the passenger in Row 10? The new system will allow people to call seat-to-seat. A fax? No problem. There will be a handy jack to plug in your portable fax machine. According to one company source, the system isn't fully installed yet because it works too slowly when everyone is using it at once. Why are airlines flocking to the technology? It occupies passengers' time, for one thing. …

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Airlines Scurry to 'Wire Up' Laurent Belsie
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