NATO Airstrikes Seen through Russian Eyes

By Benjamin Schwarz. Benjamin Schwarz, a. former foreign policy analyst fellow Research .. | The Christian Science Monitor, September 25, 1995 | Go to article overview

NATO Airstrikes Seen through Russian Eyes


Benjamin Schwarz. Benjamin Schwarz, a. former foreign policy analyst fellow Research .., The Christian Science Monitor


NATO'S airstrikes against the Bosnian Serbs - the only combat missions that the United States-led alliance has undertaken in its 46-year history - may be remembered less as the catalyst for a settlement in Bosnia than as the opening round of a new cold war.

Since last year, Moscow has repeatedly raised restrained but serious objections to NATO's military intervention in Bosnia and to the alliance's plans for expansion into East Central Europe - objections that Washington has blithely dismissed.

Finally, in a series of declarations, Russian President Boris Yeltsin dropped his measured language to issue his sternest warning yet. Pointing to the alliance's air attacks as evidence, he declared that Russia has much to fear from a NATO with an expanded reach. NATO's current operations and its future intentions, he said, will lead to "a return to two armed camps that are at war with one another." The US, however, still gives no indication that it appreciates the gravity of its actions and seems unlikely to alter the dangerous direction of its policy toward areas within Moscow's historical area of interest.

Rather, most American observers claim that Yeltsin's objections are meant merely to forestall criticism by Russia's extreme nationalists. These arguments assume that NATO military intervention troubles only "extremist" Russians. But Washington should have no illusions: Opposition to NATO's attacks and plans for expansion is probably the one major foreign policy issue on which virtually the entire Russian political class is united. Even devoted liberals and partisans of good relations with the West, such as legislator Alexei Arbatov, fear their old superpower nemesis is encroaching on their regional interests and bullying Russia by threatening its friends.

NATO, after all, was supposedly designed as a defensive alliance to repel a military attack on its member states. But in Bosnia, it has radically extended its writ by intervening within a state unconnected to the alliance. Furthermore, from Moscow's perspective, the US, by pushing to bring its powerful military alliance to Russia's borders, has reneged on a bargain it struck with Russia at the end of the cold war. Moscow agreed to quit Eastern Europe and to allow German reunification - a development that, given the history of German-Russian relations in the 20th century, Russia regarded with trepidation. Also, Moscow acceded to the continued existence of an alliance that had been hostile to it and even agreed to the inclusion of the newly reunified Germany in that alliance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

NATO Airstrikes Seen through Russian Eyes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.