How to Take the Sting out of Your Property-Tax Bill Series: YOUR MONEY

By Guy Halverson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 17, 1995 | Go to article overview

How to Take the Sting out of Your Property-Tax Bill Series: YOUR MONEY


Guy Halverson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


HIDDEN wealth may be as close as your house - and your property-tax bill.

"There's a real gold mine for citizens who appeal their current {property} tax assessment," says Peter Sepp, an official of the National Taxpayers Union (NTU), a public interest group in Alexandria, Va.

Welcome to the world of property-tax shock - and possible hidden savings. In Massachusetts, New Jersey, and parts of New York State, property taxes can run in excess of $3,000 a year for a "typical" suburban house with two or three bedrooms and an attached garage. In parts of the Midwest and South, the same house may be taxed at levels substantially below that amount, and in some cases more than half as much lower.

The real estate agent's adage that "location, location, location" is the key to homeownership, applies more than ever to property taxes. But wherever one lives, since the enactment of Proposition 13 in California in 1978 - which was a controversial tax rollback measure - Americans have increasingly rebelled against escalating property taxes. About one-third of all counties in the United States now have caps, or limits, on property-tax increases. But "many of the caps are weak or are ignored," Mr. Sepp says.

Meanwhile, costs for local-government services, including public schools, which property taxes help fund, continue to climb. The total property-tax bill is "almost certainly above $180 billion annually at the state and local level," Sepp says. That is up from around $178 billion in 1992.

Hard-pressed homeowners

Aware of taxpayer anger, some counties are scrambling to adopt special ordinances to help hard-pressed homeowners and to encourage housing improvements. In Waldwick, N.J., homeowners who make improvements of up to $15,000 on their homes are given a tax abatement on the improvements for up to five years, assuming the residence is "at least 20 years old or older," says Mary Ann Gordon, Waldwick's tax assessor.

Still, in most US counties, taxpayers find their assessments either remain the same year after year or go up after they make improvements. The upshot: Homeowners are increasingly challenging assessments - and cutting tax bills.

"Homeowners should pay very close attention to what other homes are selling for in their neighborhoods, to make certain that they are being fairly taxed," says Jordan Clark, president of the United Homeowners Association (UHA), a Washington-based action group.

Mr. Clark is concerned that rising property taxes, plus escalating homeowner costs in general, are working against homeownership. About 64 percent of all adults in the US are homeowners, down from almost 65 percent in 1982. Even more serious, he says, is that the homeowner rate for Americans between the ages of 30 and 35 has slipped from almost 58 percent in 1982 to slightly more than 50 percent today. …

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