Which Windows? Product Line Gets Blurry at Microsoft

By Mark Trumbull, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 25, 1996 | Go to article overview

Which Windows? Product Line Gets Blurry at Microsoft


Mark Trumbull, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


WILL the real Microsoft Corp. operating system please stand up?

Everybody knows that Microsoft makes the leading software to run desktop computers. But many companies wonder whether to buy Windows 95, the new version of Microsoft's bestselling software, or use Windows NT, the hardier high-end operating system.

Some customers say even Microsoft has given mixed signals lately about the boundary line between the two products, which once was sharper.

"Some of them are a little upset," says Jesse Berst of Windows Watcher, a newsletter in Microsoft's backyard, Redmond, Wash. Many aren't buying either one.

"We're mostly on 3.1 {the precursor of Windows 95}," says Phillip Gannon, senior vice president of Century Bank in Boston. The bank has tried Windows 95 on a few machines and has not been thrilled. Among other things, he says interaction with the bank's mainframe computer poses problems.

"If NT comes out better, fine," Mr. Gannon says, referring to the coming update of that software, expected in the middle of this year. But if that doesn't work out, he may wait even longer.

Mr. Berst says he expects the two versions of Windows, now far apart technologically, to grow more alike over the years, but not to merge. One (NT) will be for businesses and one for casual home users, he predicts. But for now, "Windows 95 has some tough competition," he says. The good news for the company: "That competition comes from Microsoft itself."

The software giant could be hurt, however, if potential customers are left too confused to buy.

Microsoft has tried to position Windows 95 as its mainstream product and Windows NT for users who need very rugged systems. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Which Windows? Product Line Gets Blurry at Microsoft
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.