New US Tack: Security in Asia Recent Clinton Trip Highlights Military Ties That Bind, Not Fiery Trade Disputes

By Jonathan S. Landay, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 22, 1996 | Go to article overview

New US Tack: Security in Asia Recent Clinton Trip Highlights Military Ties That Bind, Not Fiery Trade Disputes


Jonathan S. Landay, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


AS President Clinton returns to Washington today, there is a new appreciation - both in the White House and across the Pacific - for the US's 50-year-old security commitment that has been a cornerstone of Asian prosperity.

That in itself makes Mr. Clinton's trip to Japan and South Korea this past week a major departure from how this administration has viewed the region and its image in Asia. For most of his term, Clinton has hammered on the more contentious issues of trade, while security issues were largely ignored.

Policy on Japan was "subcontracted to {former US trade representative} Mickey Kantor," says Michael Swain, an Asian expert at the Rand Corp. Ironically, it was Japanese outrage over the September rape on Okinawa that jolted Clinton to action. His timing was fortuitous, coinciding with Chinese military provocations against Taiwan that raised tensions around the region and prompted the deployment of two US carrier battle groups in last month's run-up to the island's presidential election. Jitters also abound over recent North Korean belligerence, capped by Pyongyang's abrogation three weeks ago of the 1955 Korean War armistice and troop incursions into the demilitarized zone with South Korea. "All of a sudden, the president realized all was not well in East Asia," says Lawrence Chang, a political scientist at Kean College in Union, N.J. "I think for a while he was under the impression that people in East Asia were just worried about how to make more bucks." In South Korea, Clinton reaffirmed his intention to stand with Seoul and spurned a separate peace deal with its northern communist rival. In Japan, his mission was twofold. He eased strains in Okinawa over last year's rape by US servicemen by agreeing to reduce US military bases on Okinawa, and he won Tokyo's assent to assuming a greater share of bilateral security arrangements. Most significant, Clinton reaffirmed the deployment in East Asia of about 100,000 American troops, the leading edge of US power in the Pacific. The American military presence - 45,000 troops in Japan, 37,000 in South Korea and the rest stationed elsewhere - is widely regarded as key to preserving the stability underlying the phenomenal boom in trade and investment in East Asia that have become critical components of US financial and strategic surety. Japan, South Korea, and other nations gain as well, experts say. The US presence remains their main shield against perceived threats, especially China, which has been flexing its growing military and economic muscle. …

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