China Tightens Its Grip on Tibet in Attempt to Rule Feisty Region

By Sheila Tefft, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 29, 1996 | Go to article overview

China Tightens Its Grip on Tibet in Attempt to Rule Feisty Region


Sheila Tefft, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


During his three-year stint in Tibet, the young Beijing engineer, a member of China's ethnic Han majority, said he made a lot of money but counted the days until he could leave.

"It was a good opportunity because China wants to develop Tibet's economy," said the man, who agreed to go to Tibet because he was unemployed and would receive more than double the pay he was earning in the Chinese capital. "But I never felt very comfortable."

The returned worker is part of Beijing's aggressive campaign to assimilate Tibet, the Buddhist Himalayan kingdom that has fought Chinese Communist control for over four decades. China occupied Tibet in 1951 and suppressed an uprising eight years later, during which the Dalai Lama, whom Tibetans considered to be Buddhism's god-king, escaped to India, where he still lives. Although denied by Beijing, China is using the massive settlement of Han Chinese along with an iron fist against dissent and separatism to strengthen its hold on the mountainous region, international human rights groups have charged. China claimed in March that Han Chinese account for only 79,000 of Tibet's 2.39 million people. A survey completed in late 1995 showed their numbers are declining. That is contested by Western observers who estimate the largely urban Chinese population at 150,000 and likely to grow with the development of several copper mines in the region. "China runs Tibet like a colony," says a Tibetan intellectual who travels occasionally to Beijing. "Tibetans are put in certain political positions for show, although the Han Chinese control economic and political power." International human rights monitors say repression is on the rise. This month the United States-based International Campaign for Tibet reported that a new drive is under way to suppress Buddhists, more tightly control Tibetan officials, and detain monks and nuns, the most potent threat to Chinese rule. Amnesty International has also reported growing government oppression during the last three years. …

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