Shifting Eye of Africa's Storm Fragile Democracy in Sierra Leone at Risk as Liberians Flee Their Civil War

By David Hecht, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 19, 1996 | Go to article overview

Shifting Eye of Africa's Storm Fragile Democracy in Sierra Leone at Risk as Liberians Flee Their Civil War


David Hecht, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


ALONG a 2-1/2 mile stretch of West Africa's finest beaches, American soldiers, United Nations officials, and merchants cool off as waves gently roll up. Locals sell drinks and souvenirs. Overhead the occasional commercial helicopter flies in and deposits the last few evacuees from the chaos next door in Liberia.

Three American soldiers stroll down the beach in Bermuda shorts. "We're not even sure what country we're in," says one. "And right now we don't really care." They do know, however, that somewhere behind the lush mountain backdrop, rebels are fighting another vicious civil war in Africa, and that shore leave here means just that - stay by the shore.

A group of disheveled-looking United Nations staff members chat at their beachside hotel, some still in the clothes they wore when they fled Liberia. None could guess where they will be in a week. One said that what disheartened her most was the failure of the West African peacekeeping force, ECOMOG, to prevent the chaos. It "puts a question mark over the future of regional peacekeeping," she says. Regional solutions to conflict were what the UN has promoted because its shrinking budget has made it unable to act alone. Still, most of the UN personnel say they are hopeful that they will get back to Liberia. "We were really doing something for people," says an Irishman. One is more cynical. "It will take 10 years to get the country back to where it was two weeks ago," he says. Since the civil war began in 1991, greater Monrovia (the capital of Liberia) has been a "safe area" for about a million displaced people from the interior and a staging area for aid operations throughout Liberia. Fighting is reported to be continuing for the second week running with shelling and sniper fire throughout the city. Some 60,000 civilians are at risk of starvation. With most aid groups gone, "the future only holds renewed violence," according to one UN staff member. But what concerns people here still more is the prospect of humanitarian disaster spreading through the region, with millions of displaced and hungry Liberians crossing into neighboring countries, including Sierra Leone. On Wednesday, two new boat loads of evacuees from Liberia arrived in Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone. Most of those on board were Lebanese business executives and UN and ECOMOG soldiers. But there was panic that Liberian "troublemakers" were among them. The Sierra Leone government has not yet allowed one of the ships to dock. Sierra Leone has reason to be concerned. The five-year-old civil war here began when the civil war in Liberia spilled across the border. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Shifting Eye of Africa's Storm Fragile Democracy in Sierra Leone at Risk as Liberians Flee Their Civil War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.