Letters

By Levent Gumrukcu, Christine Short, Y. Leon Favreau | The Christian Science Monitor, May 31, 1996 | Go to article overview

Letters


Levent Gumrukcu, Christine Short, Y. Leon Favreau, The Christian Science Monitor


Sierra Club: Conservationists Or Radical Preservationists?

If the author of the opinion-page article "Will the Real Sierra Club Please Stand Up?" May 24, truly believes his own statistics and assumptions about our nation's forests, then he shouldn't have any quarrel with the Sierra Club. If our forests are truly abundant, then he must logically conclude that we can save a small portion of them for wildlife habitat and not log our national forests and wildlife refugees.

The problem is that our forests are in fact a finite resource, and that the ravenous American appetite shows no sign of abating.

The logging industry, in the meantime, is not practicing responsible "forest management" but is actually clear-cutting national forests under the ruse of a salvage rider recently passed by Congress.

We must ban logging on federal public lands. The fact that the Sierra Club and other "moderate" environmental groups have taken such a strident stand only serves to illustrate the desperate situation we face.

There is nothing left to compromise.

Christine Short

Belvedere, Calif.

The article asks the question "Is the real Sierra Club a true conservationist organization or a radical preservationist organization?" The answer is the latter, and the conversion didn't just happen, as the writer suggests. Sierra Club chairman Michael McCloskey has said, "Trees and rocks have rights to their own freedom to go their own way untrammeled and unfettered by man."

Sierra director Dave Foreman (founder of Earth First! …

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