Many Waters Too Dirty for a Dip This Summer Pollution from Agricultural Runoff, Land Development

By Brad Knickerbocker, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 31, 1996 | Go to article overview

Many Waters Too Dirty for a Dip This Summer Pollution from Agricultural Runoff, Land Development


Brad Knickerbocker, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


From New England to the Gulf Coast to Puget Sound, Americans count on their abundant water systems as sources of sustenance and recreation. Especially in the summer, these beaches, rivers, and lakes are places for rejuvenation. They are also reminders that clean water is essential to many sectors of the economy.

But while the environmental health of such areas has generally improved in recent years - thanks to antipollution and habitat-restoration efforts - there are signs that all is not well in United States waters.

The US Environmental Protection Agency finds that 24 years after passage of the Clean Water Act - designed to restore all US waters so that they are "fishable and swimmable" - 40 percent of rivers, lakes, and streams surveyed still are too polluted for such activities.

"One out of 5 drinking-water systems reports violations of public-health standards," EPA administrator Carol Browner warned last week.

"One out of 3 shellfish beds is closed for harvest because of contamination," Ms. Browner said. "People in many communities are warned that to protect their health, they must limit the amount of fish they eat from their local river, their local lake."

Meanwhile, new information from a national network of biological-data centers indicates that two-thirds of freshwater mussels and crayfish dependent on aquatic or wetland habitat, and more than one-third of fish and amphibians, risk extinction.

According to information from the state agency-based Natural Heritage Program recently released by The Nature Conservancy, primary threats include: agricultural runoff (containing pesticides, fertilizers, and animal waste), dams and water diversions, non-native plant and animal species (such as sport fish introduced by anglers), and loss of habitat because of residential and commercial development.

Other recent findings buttress these assertions. Drawing on government agency data, the conservation organization American Rivers reported this month that "large portions" of the Mississippi River are unsafe for swimming and similar activities. The group found "relatively surprising" levels of fecal coliform, indicating the presence of human and animal waste. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Many Waters Too Dirty for a Dip This Summer Pollution from Agricultural Runoff, Land Development
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.