Group Enlists Parents to Fight TV Violence Attorneys General Decry Media Influence

By Warren Richey, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 14, 1996 | Go to article overview

Group Enlists Parents to Fight TV Violence Attorneys General Decry Media Influence


Warren Richey, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Here's a pop quiz for parents.

If a vigilante thug knocks at your door and announces his intention to entertain your children by stabbing and shooting to death a gang of "bad guys," would you let him in?

That might sound like a ridiculous question, but these days vigilante violence, mayhem, and even murder are routine events in most American living rooms. The culprits gain entry not through the front door but through the glowing screen of a television set. By the time a youngster graduates from elementary school he or she will have witnessed 8,000 killings on TV, say researchers. Many studies confirm that this is not just benign "entertainment." Development of the V-chip and a planned television rating system are expected to help address the problem. But a coalition of all state attorneys general and the American Medical Association say parents must play the most important role in protecting their children. They are urging parents to, in effect, keep their doors closed to violence on television and in other media. "Would any of us deliberately invite someone into our homes to teach our children that violence is a good way to solve problems, will likely be rewarded, and causes no pain?," asks J. Joseph Curran Jr., attorney general for Maryland. Mr. Curran and the nation's other attorneys general are concerned about the issue because research shows that violent programs spark aggressive behavior in certain children. Law-enforcement officials say they are struggling to counter what they call an "epidemic" of juvenile violence that they say is partly linked to TV shows, movies, and video games that are desensitizing kids. To reverse this trend, the attorneys general are asking parents to monitor the content of television shows and of every CD, video game, and computer activity, to make sure they don't include destructive themes and negative influences. "To reduce violence in society we must reduce children's exposure to media violence," says Minnesota Attorney General Hubert H. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Group Enlists Parents to Fight TV Violence Attorneys General Decry Media Influence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.