Boxes Full of Suites 'Do Everything' Office Software - User-Friendly, but Budget-Hostile

By Eric C. Evarts, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 28, 1997 | Go to article overview

Boxes Full of Suites 'Do Everything' Office Software - User-Friendly, but Budget-Hostile


Eric C. Evarts, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


People want their computers to do everything these days.

So a software "suite" seems the right product for the times: It bundles together sophisticated programs for text documents, charts, spreadsheets, presentations, electronic mail, and more.

Three major software publishers, Microsoft, Lotus, and Corel, have launched new suites this year. And they all arrive with greater flexibility and easier use than their predecessors. They adopt the easy navigation style of the Internet within the programs; and they link your work more easily to the Internet's World Wide Web. Best of all, the programs now understand English, not just computerese. Not everyone needs such powerful programs or even has a powerful enough computer to use them. If your computer use is confined to word processing or spreadsheets - earlier versions of all these programs still offer powerful solutions. The newer versions offer powerful hits to the pocketbook. For this review - which tested the Microsoft and Lotus suites - the programs worked fine on a 486 chip and 20 megabytes of RAM memory. Less than that, and you may have trouble, although Microsoft says 8 megs is enough. Advances here are significant and promise to trickle into other computer applications. In Office 97, for example, putting "hyperlinks" into a document is easy, bouncing a reader to a Web site or another document. All three programs can build Web pages and search the Web for information, such as current exchange rates to convert pesos to dollars for that big monthly spreadsheet. Within the suites, navigation among programs has improved. For typing a letter, for instance, lifting a name and address out of the database program and onto the letter or an envelope is a cinch - one step. In Office 97 and Lotus SmartSuite, the biggest advances center around the use of so-called "natural language" programming. Microsoft, for example, can summarize documents in its word-processing program. Tell the program to summarize any article and it will shorten it, retain all the key points, and lose only detail. No kidding... in our numerous tests, this feature never missed a point. Seems right out of the Jetsons! Lotus SmartSuite uses the same technology to allow several people to work on the same document at the same time. If one person writes a memo, other workers can edit it, make notes and corrections, without altering the original text. …

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Boxes Full of Suites 'Do Everything' Office Software - User-Friendly, but Budget-Hostile
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