Dangerous Liaisons: War and the Environment

By Mirkarimi, Ross | The Christian Science Monitor, January 24, 1997 | Go to article overview

Dangerous Liaisons: War and the Environment


Mirkarimi, Ross, The Christian Science Monitor


While politicians and military historians celebrate the sixth anniversary of the Persian Gulf war, the ferocious onslaught against the environment and human health continues.

The Gulf war ranks among the most ecologically destructive conflicts ever, and the time has finally come for the world community to consider creating a stronger convention for the protection of the environment during and after war. This task requires a political centrist, someone like Madeleine Albright, the new United States secretary of state.

During the war, the Persian Gulf region was transformed into a disaster zone. The hundreds of oil fires that produced unprecedented amounts of pollution were extinguished within six months but became a huge air pollution laboratory; oil spilled onto the ground and into the Gulf waters, tainting underground aquifers and poisoning marine life. Attacks on refineries and petrochemical plants continue to have an insidious effect on the air, water, and soil. But the tragedy does not stop there. Thousands of unexploded bombs and mines litter the former battlefields; tons of shards of depleted uranium used for armor-piercing bullets pepper southern Iraq; military personnel were exposed to highly toxic materials through routine handling of tanks, fighter jets, and other equipment; and the discharge of organophosphate compounds, blistering agents, and gases from chemical weapons depots ostensibly contaminated ground forces. THE disparity in the response to the military and environmental effects of the conflict could hardly have been more pronounced. To force Iraq out of Kuwait, no expense was spared. An alliance of more than two dozen countries was carefully crafted, the United Nations machinery for collective security was thrown into high gear, and hundreds of thousands of soldiers and huge amounts of equipment were ferried halfway around the globe. By contrast, assessing and tackling the ecological consequences of the war remained a low priority. Instead of facilitating an honest assessment of the war's environmental consequences, the Bush administration sought to downplay them. Once the oil-well fires, the most visible impact of the war, had been extinguished and CNN declared that everything was better, any ongoing response to monitor the myriad problems was aborted. The enigmatic Gulf War Syndrome is an example of how the war's collateral effects have transcended the battlefield. …

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