Yuppies, Miners Do Battle in West New Development versus Gold Tradition

By Jillian Lloyd, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 28, 1997 | Go to article overview

Yuppies, Miners Do Battle in West New Development versus Gold Tradition


Jillian Lloyd, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Like much of the West, Colorado was built upon the dream of gold. But a century later, the quest for a precious commodity of a different sort is luring urban refugees to former mining towns in the Rocky Mountains.

The new West pioneers arrive here seeking pristine and serene mountain settings far from the bustle of city life. In small towns with names like Gold Hill, Nederland, and Eldora, the appeal of the old West is palpable. But for many newcomers, the romance has faltered upon discovering that they must share their slice of paradise with the gold-mining industry.

Nowhere is the battle more evident than in the tiny mountain community of Eldora (population 100). Here, residents have little nostalgic sentiment for the Mogul Tunnel Mine, a gold and silver mining operation established in 1897. "That mine doesn't belong here. It's an industrial use in a community of people who chose to live here for peace and quiet," says Park Teter, co-founder of Friends of Eldora Valley, a citizens' group of 80 locals who view area gold-mining ventures as an assault on their tranquil lifestyle. The debate is gathering steam throughout the West with the influx of new residents. Colorado is the fifth-fastest-growing state in the country. Since 1990, it has added some 530,000 new residents - roughly equivalent to the population of Denver. But long before the condos, ski resorts, and cattle ranches, there were gold mines, miners say. Mining was the first industry here and in much of the West, and gold-mining claims are still prevalent in these rugged canyons. Today the 1872 federal mining law that grants miners "use by right" to mining claims is as effective as the day it was written. Even so, historic mining laws are an emerging source of conflict, says Roger Flynn, director of Western Mining Action Project, a nonprofit environmental group. "State and federal mining laws are meant to encourage mining. But just because a tradition and practice is old does not leave it immune to democracy," Mr. Flynn says. Ticking off concerns about noise, dust, aesthetics, mine dump, and water quality, Mr. Teter maintains that in the 1990s, mining isn't appropriate in Eldora. Teter's group has spent the better part of a year lobbying for revisions to county zoning laws, intended to make it tougher for mines to operate in residential areas. In the coming month, the Boulder County Commissioners will vote on the proposed changes. But the mining community here, with roots back to the 1860s, counters that underground gold mines like the Mogul Tunnel have far less impact on the environment than do residents of burgeoning mountain towns. "There is so much more pollution, traffic, and noise created by these mountain bedroom communities than the mine itself ever produces," says John Miner, general manager for the Eldora mine. "The Mogul Tunnel is a mom-and-pop operation, not some huge corporate gold-mining operation." Perhaps more significant, the mineral deposits came first, says Mr. Miner - and federal law designates mining as the first and best use of land. "The rock is where God put it, and there's no moving it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Yuppies, Miners Do Battle in West New Development versus Gold Tradition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.