A Drug War Plus

The Christian Science Monitor, February 27, 1997 | Go to article overview

A Drug War Plus


Ecery year the federal government comes out with a national drug control strategy, and every year it's greeted with criticism about skewed priorities. This year, according to the head of the National Office of Drug Control Policy, Barry McCaffrey, those priorities are taking a definite turn toward prevention and education. If it's borne out with funding and action, that shift should quiet some critics who have long called for more emphasis on quelling the demand for drugs.

One indication of this policy turn came in Tuesday's formal announcement of the president's $16 billion plan to combat drugs, almost lost among the same day's new disclosures about his political fundraising tactics. His drug plan calls for $175 million a year - to be matched by private donors - for national antidrug advertising. Target: America's youth, sixth-graders through high school seniors. The only way to win the battle against drugs, Mr. McCaffrey recently told a group of Monitor writers and editors, is to keep the young from ever starting the slide toward addiction.

The ads' message that drug use is self-destructive and foolish has to be reinforced by parents, teachers, coaches, and other adults that young people are close to. But getting an effective antidrug message before youngsters during their prime TV-watching hours is a bedrock element of any credible preventive effort. McCaffrey's office notes that the amount of such advertising has fallen off in recent years, and that the decline has coincided with an increase in drug use by youth. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Drug War Plus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.