Letters

By Rains, Robert E. | The Christian Science Monitor, February 27, 1997 | Go to article overview

Letters


Rains, Robert E., The Christian Science Monitor


A Time of Adjustment for Disabilities Act

"Why the Disabilities Act Is Missing Its Mark," Jan. 16, frankly misses the mark. While the author may be knowledgeable about the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), his essay is filled with misconceptions regarding the federal income maintenance programs administered by the Social Security Administration - Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

He refers to these programs as "transition payments ... needed in the case of recoveries from severe accidents" and "pensioning off every person with a disability." Both propositions are false. The statutory definition of disability is written to preclude benefits for most persons recovering from severe accidents. The Social Security Act requires that, before any impairment can be considered under these programs, it must have lasted for 12 months, be expected to last for 12 months, or be expected to result in the death of the individual. Thus, except for a person whose condition is expected to be terminal within less than one year, SSDI and SSI benefits will be available only to those whose disabling condition is neither transitional nor temporary. Compounding the statutory restrictions, most applicants will find themselves enmeshed in a notoriously lengthy system of administrative denials and appeals that will take two or more years before eligibility is determined, after a hearing before a federal administrative law judge. In fiscal year 1995, fewer than half of all applicants for disability benefits were successful in persuading Social Security - or the courts - of their entitlement. This hardly equates to pensioning off every person with a disability. Except for the Children's SSI Disability Program, most recipients of benefits under these programs are well into middle age and not well educated. Because regulations favor those without formal education, many recipients lack a high school diploma. By definition, SSI recipients lack sufficient work history to be insured for disability purposes, and unfortunately they often do not have the skills that would make them likely candidates for rehabilitation. In recent years, restrictions in the programs have adversely affected children, persons with substance addictive disorders, and most recently, legal resident aliens. …

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