The Media Take a Beating in Cannes Films Headed to US Pictures Portray TV and Even Film as Negative Influences

By David Sterritt, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 4, 1997 | Go to article overview

The Media Take a Beating in Cannes Films Headed to US Pictures Portray TV and Even Film as Negative Influences


David Sterritt, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The Cannes filmfest is an influential media event, reminding the world that cinema and video, its technological neighbor, are today's dominant forms of mass communication and expression.

Cannes never tires of celebrating this fact, and its recently ended 50th-anniversary program was no exception. Ironically, though, many of the individual movies on view took an opposite approach - portraying various media, including film and video themselves, as dubious and even negative influences on contemporary life.

Since many of these pictures will be playing on American screens before long, it's important to note the messages they'll be carrying to audiences. There's no way to tell yet whether moviegoers, constantly bombarded by Hollywood's promotional machine, will become more media-critical when they see these films in local theaters. But it seems certain that the climate is changing among filmmakers themselves, who are becoming more inclined to question the roles played by media in cheapening our cultural environment. The trend got under way on opening night at Cannes when The Fifth Element made its European debut. Since then the picture has excelled at the American box office, underscoring Cannes's importance as a bellwether of new directions in the global film industry. Although the hero of Luc Besson's movie is Bruce Willis as a cabdriver saving Earth from extraterrestrial doom, its most attention-grabbing secondary character is a futuristic TV personality who floods the story with flamboyant behavior that makes today's trash television look tame. His antics are a savage parody of current tendencies in popular entertainment. TV also takes a beating in L.A. Confidential, due in the United States later this year. It focuses on a police officer (Guy Pearce) who believes he can enforce the law without sacrificing personal integrity. It's uncertain how much he can rely on a colleague (Kevin Spacey) whose priorities are swayed by his role as adviser to a fact-based television show. More complications come from a camera-snapping journalist (Danny DeVito) who sets up the sleazy situations his scandal-sheet then luridly exposes. Two pictures took movie violence as their primary theme. The End of Violence, filmed in Los Angeles by German director Wim Wenders, centers on a Hollywood producer (Bill Pullman) who's unprepared for violence in his life even though he's long exploited it in his movies. Wenders's message loses its impact amid convoluted plot twists, but the same can't be said of Funny Games, in which Austrian director Michael Hanneke shows a middle-class family being terrorized by two sadistic men. What might have been a tale of gratuitous horror is transformed by several moments when the villains address the audience directly, prompting us to examine our motives for watching such repellent stuff. …

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