Models for African Revival

By Kleiman, Gary N. | The Christian Science Monitor, April 30, 1997 | Go to article overview

Models for African Revival


Kleiman, Gary N., The Christian Science Monitor


As the twin menaces of tribal conflict and civil war continue to engulf Rwanda, Burundi, and Zaire, long-term economic reconstruction in these countries is low on the international agenda. But when ethnic Hutu and Tutsi refugees return home eventually and again attempt peaceful coexistence, attention will have to turn to the process of establishing the physical and policy underpinnings for development.

Despite devastation and a lack of political consensus, the three countries have useful models near at hand. Neighbors Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania have embraced stabilization and structural reform. They have integrated trade and investment, raising incomes and curtailing historical confrontation.

Zaire remains Central Africa's mineral-rich giant, whose potential has been squandered by decades of corruption and mismanagement. President Mobutu Sese Seko, its leader since independence, is believed to have amassed a multibillion-dollar fortune through diamond concessions. Fighting between government soldiers and rebels has renewed fears of hyperinflation. Prices soared more than 2,000 percent in 1994-95. Gross domestic product (GDP) has not risen for several years, and the country has been suspended since 1991 from receiving International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank aid for failure to service debts. The outlook for Burundi and Rwanda is similarly bleak. Values for key exports like bananas and coffee have slumped as ethnic massacres have decimated populations and agricultural estates. Civil servants have not been paid for months, and few major companies have maintained operations. Burundi is under an African commercial embargo to protest human rights violations. In contrast, Uganda, which also experienced mass slaughter during the reign of Idi Amin, today records GDP expansion of 10 percent. Once a pariah, it is a favorite of the development banks and will be the first beneficiary of their just-completed debt reduction plan. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Models for African Revival
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.