Your Own Niche Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, May 21, 1997 | Go to article overview

Your Own Niche Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life


"Each individual must fill his own niche in time and eternity" (Retrospection and Introspection by Mary Baker Eddy, p. 70). Whoever you are, wherever you are, this remarkable idea applies to you. You have a temporal and an eternal niche to fill-a present, practical role to play in God's plan of good; a timeless invaluableness.

If you're anything like me, that's not always the way you feel about yourself when you wake up in the morning. The niche may seem to be something reserved exclusively for others. Great leaders, maybe. Artists. Innovative business people. Celebrities. Sometimes we might feel we belong to a category of people who exist without any calling, destined forever to admire the movers and shakers from the sidelines of life. Even if others look up to us for some reason, that doesn't mean we always feel clear ourselves about our self-worth.

But we can find our niche "in time and eternity." To do so takes some understanding of the true worth of all women, children, and men. God created each one of us perfect-in His spiritual likeness. Based on this spiritual premise, our self-worth becomes clearer, seen as wholly dependent on our individual relationship to God. Independent of professional status, family ties, age, or any other social factors, each of us is His child. On this basis, all are equally important. In fact, we are vital to God, and play a vital role in relation to one another. Every one of us always has a crucial part to play, a unique purpose. If human experience says otherwise-that we're playing second (or third) fiddle to more important members of the family, to more prominent people in the neighborhood, to higher-flying co-workers, or to anyone else-we can refuse to go along with this view of ourselves. In point of fact, God created one standard of good that we can all live up to. Actually, we're each essential to His complete expression of Himself. It's possible to discern scientifically and accept humbly the identity God gives us and others. Our lives will increasingly confirm what we hold in thought. It's not that we will ever become carbon copies of those we look up to. …

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Your Own Niche Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
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