It's a Winning Year for US Broadcasters Washington Hands Old-Line TV Networks Gains over Cable and Telecom Rivals - at the Viewing Public's Expense

By Landay, Jerry M. | The Christian Science Monitor, April 23, 1997 | Go to article overview

It's a Winning Year for US Broadcasters Washington Hands Old-Line TV Networks Gains over Cable and Telecom Rivals - at the Viewing Public's Expense


Landay, Jerry M., The Christian Science Monitor


This has been a lush spring for the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), perhaps the finest in its 74-year history. The NAB, the chief lobbying arm of US television and radio networks and most of the nation's broadcast stations, has accumulated a string of triumphs that preserves "old technology's" standing as the towering power of telemedia amid the putative gales of digital change. It is as though the White House, the Congress, and the courts conspired in favor of the sailing vessel and the biplane to put off for decades the ages of steam and jet propulsion.

Because of NAB victories, broadcast firms are poised to win the new-technology competition for mass audiences in the tele-industrial epoch against the behemoths of the telephone, cable, computer, and satellite communications industries. Network owners - Westinghouse, Disney, General Electric, Fox - are able to use their cash cows as a wedge into leadership of the age of new media. They are diversifying by acquiring cable and Internet properties, and moving aggressively into global television. In recent weeks:

* The Federal Communications Commission predictably voted to give each of the nation's 1,500 TV stations, most of them commercial, new channels for advanced digital television and other uses. Though the broadcast spectrum is, by statute, public property, the government exacted no quid pro quos from the for-profit operators. Stations can claim the new channels at once, simply by saying they want one. Network stations in major markets must agree to start broadcasting digital signals within two years. * The Supreme Court, in a 5-to-4 decision, affirmed the law holding that cable systems must carry the signals of local television stations. Amid a scramble for scarce channel space, the cable industry lost its argument that it had a First Amendment right to decide how to dole out its territory. The justices thus maintained a competitive edge for broadcasters, preserving the large audiences that cable delivers to traditional broadcasters. * The broadcasting industry celebrated the first anniversary of the Telecommunications "Reform" Act, which the NAB succeeded in expanding from a set of ground rules for competing telephone enterprises into a giant Christmas tree for the easy acquisition of radio and television stations. The act has touched off a race toward monopoly in broadcasting that is likened to the Oklahoma land rush. All this has lofted the NAB, already a powerhouse, to the top of Washington special interests. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

It's a Winning Year for US Broadcasters Washington Hands Old-Line TV Networks Gains over Cable and Telecom Rivals - at the Viewing Public's Expense
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.