Hospitals Guarantee Health-Care Delivery 'PIZZAFICATION OF MEDICINE'?

By William H. Carlile, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 8, 1997 | Go to article overview

Hospitals Guarantee Health-Care Delivery 'PIZZAFICATION OF MEDICINE'?


William H. Carlile, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Thirty minutes or it's free. The marketing concept has become a hit in the business of pizza delivery, but is it good medical practice in the nation's emergency rooms?

Columbia Medical Center Phoenix is one of a number of hospitals in the US that are testing the idea for patients with minor emergencies. It and other affiliates of Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp., the hospital-chain giant, are offering the 30-minute guarantee of service in an effort to attract emergency-room patients, who say long waits are their top complaint.

The Columbia experiment has intensified an already-searing debate over quality of medical care in an increasingly commercialized - and competitive - environment. It comes at a time when high costs of health care have been driving the nation to rethink the way health services are delivered and shifting the balance of power between doctors and the business office. The idea is causing some in the medical community, notably emergency-room doctors, to ask whether a profession that prides itself on adhering to the Hippocratic oath should be resorting to the same marketing techniques as fast-food chains. Columbia's pitch is simply stated in its newspaper advertisements: "You'll be seen by our triage nurse and then an ER professional in 30 minutes or your visit is free." Typical emergency-room waits are about 1-1/2 hours. Improving its emergency-room service has paid off, according to Columbia spokeswoman Caroline Berger. Since the 30-minute deal started a few months ago, Columbia has seen a rise in emergency-room visits. The medical center sees about 15,000 emergency-room cases a year, a small number compared with other Phoenix area hospitals. During a recent survey, she notes, the hospital recorded a 5 to 10 percent increase in weekday emergency-room traffic, compared with the same period a year ago. On weekends, patient traffic jumped 20 percent over the comparable year-ago period. Some patients are driving past other emergency rooms in more outlying areas to come to Columbia, believing that the total time to receive treatment will actually be less than if they had stopped at a closer site, Ms. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hospitals Guarantee Health-Care Delivery 'PIZZAFICATION OF MEDICINE'?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.