Spiritual Beauty Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, August 28, 1997 | Go to article overview

Spiritual Beauty Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life


A pair of doves nestled in a tree. Deer nibbling on leaves. Squirrels scurrying up tree trunks. Snow-capped mountains. The steady flow of the Deschutes River. These were just a few of the lovely sights that my husband and I enjoyed when we took a biking trip in the high desert country of Oregon.

It was during this vacation that I learned a spiritual lesson. I learned the importance of looking up.

I realized that if my focus had been downward the whole time, on the paved bike paths we were using, I would not have enjoyed all the beauty around me. This brought to light a fundamental truth I have learned in my study of Christian Science-that beauty is spiritual. If we measure beauty, including that of ourselves and others, from the viewpoint of physicality, we often don't see much beauty. That's like a biker focusing on the pavement; the view is very limited. However, if we understand beauty on a spiritual level, looking up to God, who is Spirit, we will see His nature, His loveliness, everywhere. How does a person view beauty on a spiritual level? By discerning, noting, the expression of qualities of God in ourselves and others. These are qualities such as joy, love, grace, gentleness, unselfishness. Spiritual qualities. When we express these Godlike qualities, actively live them, we're actually expressing beauty! God is the source of this beauty. Every single good attribute flows from God and is expressed by His spiritual reflection, His sons and daughters, you and me. When we choose to live these qualities every day, we are choosing to be beautiful. The Bible says in First Samuel: "Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; . . . for the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart" (16:7). These were the words Samuel heard from God when he was deciding whom to anoint as king. Jesse had had seven of his sons come before Samuel, but not one was chosen. It was then that Samuel was impelled to ask Jesse if he had another son. …

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