Captured by Colorful Football on a Black-and-White TV

By Atkin, Ross | The Christian Science Monitor, November 24, 1997 | Go to article overview

Captured by Colorful Football on a Black-and-White TV


Atkin, Ross, The Christian Science Monitor


Even on beautiful fall Sunday afternoons, I huddled in our basement to watch the Chicago Bears. I wouldn't come out, not even to play tag football, until the game was over. I loved playing tag football, but I lived and died with the Bears. It was the 1960s, and the National Football League was just beginning to captivate the American public.

There was an unforgettable newness to the experience. For in those days, baseball was king. Until a friend started talking about a quarterback named Johnny Unitas, I knew no one who was watching or following pro football. It had existed for decades, but was almost a secret. The long arm of TV was beginning to change that.

It was a simpler time in league history, and licensed NFL merchandise wasn't on every corner. In fact, one of my most frustrating boyhood shopping experiences was trying to find a Bears jacket I'd seen advertised in Sports Illustrated. On a summer vacation in Chicago from our home in southern Indiana, my family and I traipsed all over downtown to find the jacket of my dreams. We couldn't. Not in Marshall Field's, not in any sporting-goods store. My mother surprised me at Christmas with a homemade Bears souvenir: a black sweatshirt with sewn-on orange lettering and trim. (Much later I learned that the uniforms were navy blue.) There was no Madison Avenue hype, no extensive pregame and halftime shows, no Super Bowl. Games arrived unadorned, and either you liked what you saw or you didn't. I loved the directness of it. You had to work at being a fan, and I liked that, too. Pro football was a new world, full of fascinating characters. For me, Bears Coach George Halas was foremost among them. Halas was a one-man time line of pro-football history, the quintessential sports patriarch. "Papa Bear" was founder, owner, and coach of a team that began as the Decatur (Ill.) Staleys. He had been at that meeting in a Hupmobile showroom in Canton, Ohio, in 1920 when the league was formed. For 11 seasons, he even played end for his team. He is the only person associated with the NFL for every one of its first 50 years. Until one develops a rooting interest, any sports-watching experience is shallow. In the Halas-led Bears, I found a team I loved. …

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