US Pours Money, Expertise into Halting Lethal 'Blooms' Algae Problems off America's Coasts Prompt a $15-Million Research Effort

By Peter N. Spotts, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 8, 1997 | Go to article overview

US Pours Money, Expertise into Halting Lethal 'Blooms' Algae Problems off America's Coasts Prompt a $15-Million Research Effort


Peter N. Spotts, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Armed with sample jars, microscopes, and new federal grants, marine scientists are embarking on the most ambitious effort in US history to turn the tide against harmful algae blooms along the nation's coasts.

Sudden explosions in the number of tiny plankton - sometimes visible as "red" or "brown" tides - kill or contaminate fish and shellfish by the millions, undermining ocean-based economies and posing public-health risks.

Around the world, researchers have been trying to curb the spread of harmful blooms using everything from powdered clay to algae-eating clams. Now the US is joining the effort with a $15-million research effort that will utilize such things as satellites and sophisticated computer models. Led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the program represents the federal government's first major attempt to tackle a problem that many marine biologists say is getting worse. The objective is to learn as much as possible about the factors that give rise to harmful algae blooms. Ultimately, researchers hope to develop quick means of identifying, forecasting, and dissipating blooms. "There's pretty good evidence that blooms are spreading," says Percy Donaghay, a senior marine-research scientist at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography. THE scientific assault comes at a time of heightened congressional interest in the ocean's microscopic malefactors. This summer, blooms of a relatively new species of plankton - Pfisteria piscicida - triggered a substantial fish kill in Chesapeake Bay, one of Washington's favorite playgrounds. Tomorrow, the House Subcommittee on Wildlife and Oceans is scheduled to hold hearings on the outbreak. Marine scientists note that the Chesapeake Bay outbreak has highlighted the significance of a recurring problem that stretches from the Gulf of Maine to the Gulf of Alaska and beyond. In some cases, blooms of harmful algae are increasing. In many others, researchers are discovering additional species that are toxic. "We're starting to define the boundaries of the problem much better, and they're big boundaries," says Don Anderson, a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, Mass. Initially, the new research effort is focusing on three targets: the Gulf of Maine, Florida's Gulf coast, and waters off Long Island, according to Leon Cammen, with NOAA's National Sea Grant Program Office. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

US Pours Money, Expertise into Halting Lethal 'Blooms' Algae Problems off America's Coasts Prompt a $15-Million Research Effort
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.