God Promotes

By Peake, Beverly | The Christian Science Monitor, June 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

God Promotes


Peake, Beverly, The Christian Science Monitor


A Christian Science perspective: Low performance on standardized tests sometimes means a child must repeat a grade. How can children and parents deal with the disappointment that results, especially if they feel the tests are unfair?

"Thousands of third-graders at risk of being held back" headlines a story about students doing badly on standardized tests in my state, Florida. Suggested reasons for the poor performances are tougher grading, challenges at home, and unfamiliarity with English.

Having to repeat a grade can be disheartening to kids, their parents, and teachers, especially when the contributing factors seem unfair. Hopefully, measures will be taken to level the testing playing field. In the meantime, these setbacks needn't leave a child forever behind. We have stellar examples, from Bible times to the present, proving that point.

When the prophet Samuel went to select Israel's future king from among Jesse's sons, they all lined up for review except the youngest, David, relegated by his father to the sheep pasture. Yet when brought forth at Samuel's insistence, he was found to be the one most worthy of royal anointing. Later, David was again sidelined when his brothers went off to fight the Philistines. Yet the opportunity arose for him to successfully challenge the giant Goliath - and save his country (see I Samuel 16:1-13; 17:1-50).

In more modern times, it's reported that young Beethoven was told he was a hopeless composer; that Thomas Edison's behavior issues limited him to three years of formal education; and that Steven Spielberg was rejected from attending University of Southern California film school.

Undaunted by these negatives, all three went on to perform brilliantly in their fields, making major, lasting contributions to the world. …

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