Beam Us Up ... to Office of the Future as Envisioned by City Firm

By Kirdavis, Journal Record Reporter | THE JOURNAL RECORD, April 10, 1985 | Go to article overview

Beam Us Up ... to Office of the Future as Envisioned by City Firm


Kirdavis, Journal Record Reporter, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The future in office automation is not "Star Wars" but "Star Trek," according to Keith Bolton, president of Commercial Communications In c., 1132 N. Broadway Ave.

Total office automation will combine voice, data, text and image, Bolton said. And it is available today - almost.

In its exhibition at the 1985 Southwest Computer Conference in Oklahoma City, Commercial Communications has arranged the first national display of the Mitel Superstation, the Mitel SX-2000 switching system and the Motorola Dyna T-A-C cellular modem.

The three form the basis for Commercial Communication's office of the future, Bolton said.

"In this, corporations have the opportunity to access their database and files whether they are in the office or whether they are out of the office," he said.

"No other company is doing that. AT&T, IBM, they're talking about it, but they're not doing it.

"Another key thing," Bolton said, "is that we're doing all this for Oklahoma. We're one of the first in the nation to be using this, and we're doing it in Oklahoma."

The Mitel Superstation combines IBM compatability with complete telecommunications, calendar and electronic directory software packaged with simple menu commands. The $4,500 to $6,500 system represents the new type of office console, the "attendant terminal," Bolton said.

"It integrates all desktop devices, communications, the calculator, calendar, rolodex," said staff member Tom Smith.

"It is the price of a standard PC with the same factors, yet it takes half the space of a traditional telecommunications unit, a third the space of a data processor."

The fourth generation Mitel SX-2000 combines digital telephone switching with four Motorola 68000 microprocessors and three Winchester hard disk drives. It is the only system capable of commandinga 1.37 gigahertz band width, Bolton said, which is wide enough for simultaneous communication using voice, data, text and video.

The one drawback, he said, is that no firm makes software to take advantage of the SX-2000 capabilities.

"The architecture isn't there. People aren't ready to pay for it," he said.

Within three years, however, Bolton expects image transfer to be a reality. Workstations will house CRTs able to transmit video pictures in addition to voice, data or text display.

"It all depends on the impact when AT&T or IBM-Rolm develop it. But with companies like us pushing it, it could be sooner," he said.

Through the same period, Bolton expects cellular telephones to be reduced to the size of pocket calculators, resembling the communicators popularized in the 1960s television series "Star Trek. …

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