Osage Indian Tribe of Oklahoma Awarded Pair of Grants

By Tipton, David | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 17, 1985 | Go to article overview

Osage Indian Tribe of Oklahoma Awarded Pair of Grants


Tipton, David, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced recently that "The Osage Indian Tribe of Oklahoma has been awarded two HUD grants to assist in the construction and equipping of a plant for manufacturing modular residential building components," said Charles Ming, manager of the Oklahoma City office of HUD.

The plant, known as Osage Precision Homes, will be located in the Osage Industrial Park near Hominy. It will be owned and operated by Nu-Con International Inc.

The first grant, $250,000 from the Indian Community Development Block Grant program, will fund construction of the plant itself. The second grant, $198,000 from the Urban Development Action Grant, will be loaned by the tribe to the developer for the purchase of machinery to equip the plant.

The state of Oklahoma is also participating in the funding with a $350,000 grant from the "Small Cities" Community Development Block Grant program to the city of Hominy.

Hominy, in turn, will loan the funds to the developer for the purchase of machinery and equipment and for operating funds.

The loans will be paid back to the tribe and Hominy, who can use the pay-back for further community or economic developments.

These three grants are joined with developer's equity from Nu-Con International of $438,000 to complete the financing package for the project of $1.2 million.

"Nu-Con International's goal is to produce affordable, quality housing for families of average income to bridge the gap between $28,000 mobile homes and $48,000 "built on the site' housing," Ming said. . .

- A plan to consolidate the two largest real estate appraisal associations has not received the required two-thirds approval vote of the membership of the American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers of the National Association of Realtors.

The plan, as approved by the Society of Real Estate Appraisers last October, would have joined the nation's oldest group, the American Institute, with the Society, the nation's largest, to form theReal Estate Appraisal Institute, according to Society President Richard E. Nichols, Senior Real Estate Analyst.

It was the goal of thes proposed consolidation to end public confusion over the proliferation of appraisal groups and appraiser designations, Nichols said.

Both the Society and the American Institue are headquartered in Chicago with local chapters throughout the country. The Society was formed in 1935 as the Society of Residential Appraisers, changingits name to the present form in 1963. Among its goals then and now are the education and designation of appraisers qualified to serve the public, and the promulgation and enforcement of a Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Practice and Conduct. . .

- Engineering News-Record magazine has just released its 22nd annual ranking of the top 400 construction firms nationwide. J.E. Dunn Construction Co.of Kansas City, Tulsa and Denver is ranked 63rd among the top 400 contractors in the nation, with a total of $295 million in new contracts awarded in 1984.

The ranking is based on the total volume of new contract awards received in the previous year.

The $295 million figure more than doubles Dunn's volume of new contract awards reported in 1983 and representss a milestone as the largest volume of new contrtact awards in the company's 15-year advancement in the magazine's ranking.

In addition, with a total of $152.7 million in 1984 in construction management awards, Dunn also was ranked 37th of 75 construction management firms surveyed nationwide. . .

- ERA Bob Linn & Associates's auction department is a "resounding success", Bob Linn, president of the firm, stated.

The auction department allows the company, Linn said, "to better meet the contemporary needs of today's home buyer and seller."

The department is headed by Robert Hawks, a professional realtor and licensed auctioneer. …

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