Stock Market Posts Record Closing with 12.43 Increase

THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 17, 1985 | Go to article overview

Stock Market Posts Record Closing with 12.43 Increase


NEW YORK (AP) - Stock prices swept ahead to new highs in active trading Tuesday after the market responded calmly to the latest news on President Reagan's health.

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials climbed 12.43 to 1,347.89, topping the record closing high of 1,338.60 it set last Friday. Several other, broader market measures also rose to new peaks.

Volume on the New York Stock Exchange stepped up to 132.50 million shares from 103.92 million Monday.

Wall Street passed a bull-market landmark when Wilshire Associates' index of 5,000 stocks reached $2 trillion for the first time, rising $19.5 billion to $2.015 trillion.

Just after the market closed on Monday, doctors reported that a polyp they had removed from the President's colon was cancerous.

But they also said they found no evidence that the malignancy had spread. They estimated the chances of no recurrence of the cancer to be better than 50 percent.

On Tuesday, Larry Speakes, the White House spokesman, said, ""There are no complications on the President's road to recovery.'' Financial analysts said investors were heartened by reports of Reagan's rapid recovery from his surgery.

However, they also observed that the situation raised some uncertainty about prospects for legislative action on measures being pushed by the President to narrow the federal budget deficit and overhaul the tax system.

At the same time, Wall Streeters were looking ahead to congressional testimony Wednesday and Thursday by Chairman Paul Volcker of the Federal Reserve, for possible signs of the future course of theFed's credit policy and interest rates.

International Business Machines climbed 3 to 128 1/2. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Stock Market Posts Record Closing with 12.43 Increase
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.