Personal Computers Aren't What They Used to Be

By Mintz, Jessica | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 8, 2009 | Go to article overview

Personal Computers Aren't What They Used to Be


Mintz, Jessica, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Personal computers are changing -- and not just because of the recent launch of Windows 7. Visit an electronics store and you might find laptops are missing a familiar component. You could experiment with new ways of controlling some computers. And you'll see portable PCs slimming down.

Even with all the attention lavished on Apple's iPhone and Amazon.com Inc.'s Kindle this year, your PC likely is still the center of your digital universe. Here's a look at what the season's computer trends mean for you.

We're over drives

Computers have come with "optical drives," slots for CDs or DVDs, for years. They've been useful for installing new software, watching movies or transferring music libraries into digital form. But one of the biggest lessons from the craze for "netbooks" -- little laptops designed mainly for browsing the Web -- is that people were so excited about the small, easy-to-carry size that they didn't miss having a CD or DVD drive.

Apple Inc. got rid of an optical drive two years ago when it introduced the first sliver-thin MacBook Air. That wasn't seen as a trendsetting step at the time because the computer, which cost $1,800 then, wasn't meant for mainstream consumption. But netbooks, which start at $250 on BestBuy.com, surely are made for everyone. The wee laptops' popularity is proof that people are finding it easy enough to download software, movies and music to portable computers, especially with the widespread availability of Wi-Fi and cellular Internet service. And plenty of services let you store files over the Internet, eliminating the need to burn backups to discs.

Taking out the optical drive doesn't significantly lower prices. Doing so does let PC makers design much thinner laptops. Companies including Dell Inc. and Hewlett-Packard Co. have pulled DVD drives out of mid-range to more expensive computers, such as HP's Pavilion dm3z, which starts at $550, all the way up to the $1,700-and-up HP Envy and Dell's $1,500-and-up Adamo.

You just might want to think twice if you're hooked on transferring CDs into MP3s -- or if you spend a lot of time watching DVDs on airplanes and don't want to squint at your iPod screen or get a separate portable video player.

Good enough is plenty

It might sound impressive when a PC sales pitch mentions multicore processors, state-of-the-art graphics chips, 4 or 6 or 8 gigabytes of memory and hard drives with a terabyte -- 1,000 gigabytes -- of storage. But another thing netbooks showed is that with a few exceptions -- such as professional video editing, and maybe hard-core videogame playing -- having lots of PC power is overkill.

There's very little software that can take advantage of these powerful computers, says technology analyst Rob Enderle. That means there's no "killer app," the program that's so cool or so useful it persuades everyday PC users to trade up.

While the microprocessors that act as the brains inside netbooks are less powerful than even those found in inexpensive full-sized laptops, they are sufficient for most Web browsing, e-mailing and word processing. …

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