How Big Is Your Infinite?

By Brightman, Sue | The Christian Science Monitor, July 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

How Big Is Your Infinite?


Brightman, Sue, The Christian Science Monitor


A Christian Science perspective: Recent news of the possibility of scientists' discovery of the subatomic particle Higgs boson, also known as the 'God particle,' evokes fresh thought about what makes up our world.

One Father's Day I wrote my dad a poem. I wanted to express how much he had opened the breadth of my awareness and my appreciation for life. But I wasn't quite sure how to capture it.

Then I remembered a question posed once by a Sunday School teacher: "How big is your infinite?" she had asked. This provocative question became the entree to my poem of appreciation for the person who had taught me to fish, to appreciate other cultures, and to travel - locally and abroad - with a sense of wonder.

Even more than that, though, he taught me to actively explore my questions about the reality of life itself by turning to the spiritual.

"Turning to the spiritual" has different meanings for different people. No doubt, however, our various meanings always start with a Higher Power. Perhaps we could even say the Father-Mother of the infinite, whom I was taught to call God.

"God is Love," wrote the Discoverer and Founder of Christian Science, Mary Baker Eddy, echoing the biblical declaration. "More than this we cannot ask, higher we cannot look, farther we cannot go" ("Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures," p. 6).

Thinking about the infinitude of a Higher Power, or divine Love, we may be enticed to revisit what we've learned about our universe. Over the last few years alone, new discoveries have been made that have expanded our knowledge about the vastness of life beyond our original concepts.

For example, a NASA photograph of the Tadpole Galaxy shows the result of two galaxies colliding. Around the newly formed mega galaxy, including its newly formed "tail," are thousands of what appear to be stars. It was pointed out to me that each "star" is actually another galaxy. And each galaxy, like our own Milky Way, has roughly 100 billion stars. What awe such a realization can inspire!

Very recently, the tentative discovery of the Higgs boson represents a potential milestone in the exploration of nature. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Big Is Your Infinite?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.