Libraries Target Growing E-Book Audience; Still, Some Readers Are Reluctant to Use the Electronic Volumes Even Though They Can Be Checked out for Free, and Libraries Are Hesitant about Paying a Big Purchase Price

By Henderson, Jane | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), June 22, 2012 | Go to article overview

Libraries Target Growing E-Book Audience; Still, Some Readers Are Reluctant to Use the Electronic Volumes Even Though They Can Be Checked out for Free, and Libraries Are Hesitant about Paying a Big Purchase Price


Henderson, Jane, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Most U.S. libraries lend e-books, but most people don't know about it: Only 22 percent realize the fast-growing digital format is available, according to a new survey. And even fewer people - 12 percent of e-book readers - have borrowed an e-book from the library in the past year, according to a poll released today by the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project.

"I'm a little surprised," Patrick Wall, director of the University City Public Library, said Thursday when told about the survey.

"Libraries are all trying to educate patrons."

The St. Louis Public Library has hundreds of requests for e- books every month, said Barb Knotts, manager for electronic collections.

In just the past 18-24 months, she said, e-book lending has surpassed the demand for audiobooks. Library card holders don't even have to go to the library to check out an e-book. Most systems allow patrons to download e-books from the library's website.

"It takes time to build any audience," Knotts said. "Libraries are now using social media to alert people about new titles."

The Pew survey delves into the tangle of issues libraries face with the evolving e-book world.

Some of those might be higher than patron ignorance on a library's list of concerns:

- E-books can cost libraries many times what a print book does.

Last year's big summer release, "A Dance With Dragons," by George R.R. Martin, was offered to the University City library at $19.95 for a hardcover, but a single e-book cost $85.

- Popular titles aren't always available at any price. Big publishers are grappling with how to stay in business and sell digital content to libraries.

- Library users want more of every kind of material, but libraries don't have unlimited money and find outdated or confusing copyright laws an obstacle.

- New owners of e-book readers say there is a learning curve, and it may take time before they decide to learn how to borrow digital books.

Sue Rudman of Edwardsville has owned a Nook for less than two years. She knows her library has e-books but says, "You tend to get dependent on having your own stuff on your own reader."

The 46-year-old mother of two has bought 37 e-book titles ranging from genealogy research to vampire novels. She reads several at a time, depending on her mood.

"I like to have my books. If I like a book, I want the option to go back and get it off my (Nook) shelf again."

In the Pew survey, 32 percent of respondents said the e-book title selection at their library was "good." But 56 percent of e- book borrowers said they had tried to get a title only to learn the library didn't carry it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Libraries Target Growing E-Book Audience; Still, Some Readers Are Reluctant to Use the Electronic Volumes Even Though They Can Be Checked out for Free, and Libraries Are Hesitant about Paying a Big Purchase Price
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.