Leave Live Animals out of Pediatric Training; Health Education; St. Louis Children's Hospital, Washington U. Should Stop Using Cats and Ferrets for Course That Teaches Intubation of Babies; OTHER VIEWS

By Tait, Cindy | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

Leave Live Animals out of Pediatric Training; Health Education; St. Louis Children's Hospital, Washington U. Should Stop Using Cats and Ferrets for Course That Teaches Intubation of Babies; OTHER VIEWS


Tait, Cindy, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Next week, St. Louis Children's Hospital and Washington University in St. Louis will hold a course called Pediatric Advanced Life Support in which trainees are supposed to learn pediatric intubation - inserting a tube into the windpipe of baby to assist breathing - by repeatedly forcing a hard plastic tube down cats' throats. This painful and inferior procedure continues to be conducted on animals several times a year even though more humane and effective infant simulators are the standard across the country for this training.

I am a paramedic, a flight nurse, and president of the largest medical training facility in Southern California. I am also one of the original developers of the PALS course. For three years, I have participated in an effort to urge the Children's Hospital and the university to modernize their PALS curricula - including traveling to St. Louis from California at my own expense to protest - but I have long opposed the use of animals for this training in general because the procedure is cruel and unnecessary. You don't have to take my word for it. The American Heart Association, which creates the curriculum for the PALS course, has clearly stated that it, "does not require or endorse the use of animals in PALS courses" and that "the AHA recommends that any hands-on intubation training for the AHA PALS course be performed on lifelike human manikins."

Repeated intubation can cause bleeding, swelling and scarring in the mouths and throats of animals and even lead to more serious injuries such as collapsed lungs and death. Further, as a training tool, animals are not helpful because they possess drastically different anatomy from that of human infants, which can mislead course participants and give them a false sense of confidence in their skills. In my own experience I have found that using cats is often a distraction for course participants who are emotionally troubled by harming animals as well.

As I have described at medical conferences and in academic journals, such as the Journal of Emergency Nursing, studies show that people trained on simulators that mimic human anatomy are better at intubating babies than people trained using animals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Leave Live Animals out of Pediatric Training; Health Education; St. Louis Children's Hospital, Washington U. Should Stop Using Cats and Ferrets for Course That Teaches Intubation of Babies; OTHER VIEWS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.