In Pakistan, Girl Freed but Blasphemy Debate Still Stuck

By Siddiqui, Taha | The Christian Science Monitor, September 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

In Pakistan, Girl Freed but Blasphemy Debate Still Stuck


Siddiqui, Taha, The Christian Science Monitor


Pakistan released from jail a Christian girl accused of burning Muslim religious texts and flew her to an undisclosed location by government helicopter.

Due to the security concerns surrounding her and the family, the girl is being kept in governments protective custody and there are plans to settle them outside Islamabad, says Tahir Naveed Chaudhry, one of her lawyers.

The courts had approved the girl's bail on Friday at a sum of one million rupees (equivalent to $10,500), on the grounds of her being a minor. The accusations against the girl had also lost strength when it emerged that a local cleric had planted burnt pages of the Quran in the evidence, in order to evict Christians from the locality they were living in.

Activists seeking to reform Pakistan's stringent blasphemy laws had hoped this case would spur public debate and government action toward amending the laws. However, that has not happened yet, say activists, and the girl's release may cause the spotlight to fade.

Even though we are happy that the child is now reunited with her parents, I am unhappy about the public face the government put on during the ordeal. The state did not come with any long term resolve to stop the abuse of blasphemy laws, and the debate does not even seem to go in that direction, says Peter Jacob, head of one of the largest minority rights activist groups in Pakistan.

The blasphemy laws, which date back to the colonial times in South Asia, were carried forward in the constitution by Pakistani authorities after the country's independence in 1947. In the 1980s, draconian amendments to the laws by a military dictator were introduced, to the extent that anyone found guilty of committing blasphemy can be punished for life, and in severe cases, with a death sentence.

The text of the law has problems but even if that is changed, it is the mindset of society that needs to be changed, says Marvi Sirmed, a social activist, who has been threatened many times over her strong secular views. Until and unless the state divorces itself from religion, and becomes secular, persecution of minorities will continue to happen, Ms. Sirmed adds.

Religious clerics and a majority of the population in Pakistan still defend the laws, and do not tolerate any talks of reforms. Such support was underscored by the case of Salmaan Taseer, the governor of Pakistan's Punjab province. When Mr. Taseer publicly denounced the laws last year and supported a Christian woman facing a death sentence for blasphemy, he was assassinated in broad daylight by his own police guard, Mumtaz Qadri. Mr. Qadri is on death row now but enjoys popular support in the country and is considered as a hero by many in Pakistan. …

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