Readers Write: Test Scores Can't Measure Teachers; Poor Civics Education Threatens US Democracy

The Christian Science Monitor, September 17, 2012 | Go to article overview

Readers Write: Test Scores Can't Measure Teachers; Poor Civics Education Threatens US Democracy


Poor civics ed threatens US democracy

The July 30 commentary from Scott Warren, Iris Chen, and Eric Schwarz "US democracy at risk unless students learn civics" should be required reading by every state legislator.

Along the way, while making our so-called educational progress, Americans have forgotten to teach the basic lessons that make us better citizens, responsible voters the guidelines for choosing those to represent us. But since many schools no longer teach civics (or even much history), these tools are not available.

This is a tragedy one that we are seeing the results of as our government flounders, leaders fail to lead, and fewer and fewer real statesmen and women serve in Congress. Instead we see arrogance and disassociation with the electorate.

It would be shocking (well, maybe not) to learn how many high school students don't know the capital of their own state. But they can tell you who the best-paid basketball player is or which Hollywood actor or actress is getting a divorce.

Norm Rourke

Beggs, Okla.

Test scores can't fully measure teachers

Regarding the Aug. 13 cover story, "The measure of a teacher:" The comparison between the evaluation of teachers and that of surgeons is fallacious. The goals of surgeons are primarily physical. …

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Readers Write: Test Scores Can't Measure Teachers; Poor Civics Education Threatens US Democracy
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