U.S. Must Back Nations Seeking Democratic Rule

By Laccetti, Silvio | The Buffalo News (Buffalo, NY), September 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

U.S. Must Back Nations Seeking Democratic Rule


Laccetti, Silvio, The Buffalo News (Buffalo, NY)


Recent tragic and violent events in the Arab world punctuated yet another dismal chapter in our mutual relations. Ostensibly, these events were a protest to an American short film that denigrated the prophet Muhammad.

But there are a number of root causes that explain them, including Arab anger and frustration with U.S.-Israeli policy, Third World perceptions of America as the proponent of excessive materialism in a world still teeming with poverty and a strong anti- colonial sentiment directed toward the United States. This latter condition is a dilemma least understood by Americans.

How did it come to pass that the United States has become a symbol of neo-imperialism in so much of the world when we began our national existence as the first anti-imperialist nation ever? The ideals of 1776, uniquely expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, have served as the pillars of all subsequent struggles for freedom. Even North Vietnam's Ho Chi Minh was enamored of them.

True, our small foray into imperialism in 1898 resulted in acquiring territories from Spain, notably the Philippines and Puerto Rico. Early on, the Philippines, judged unready for independence after the war, were promised freedom by 1944. Puerto Ricans became U.S. citizens in 1917.

In contrast to this "colonial" record has been our periodic 20th century intervention in Latin American affairs. It is in our own hemisphere where our anti-colonial dilemma first surfaces.

But the real watershed for passage of the United States from the champion of anti-colonialism to neo-imperialist power comes with the post-World War II changes that redefined the entire political profile of the planet. First, our European allies were all colonial powers, determined to hang on to an empire even as their defeats in Africa and Asia spawned national independence movements. Second, the Cold War with the Soviet Union ? which might, at some point, turn nuclear-hot ? meant we had to support our allies.

The first turning point defining the American dilemma came with the Suez Crisis of 1956. Britain, France and Israel went to war against Egypt when President Gamal Abdel Nasser sought to nationalize the Suez Canal. To the surprise of the French and British, the United States did not support them or Israel. But the Soviets, under Nikita Khruschev, skillfully played the anti- colonial card as they sought to become a presence in the Middle East. And the United States lost a great opportunity to serve as a broker in the Arab-Israeli quandry. It was only after two Arab- Israeli wars in 1967 and 1973 that the United States was able to assume the broker role. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Must Back Nations Seeking Democratic Rule
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.