Murder Case Goes to Missouri Supreme Court

By Gaug, Andrew | St. Joseph News-Press, October 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

Murder Case Goes to Missouri Supreme Court


Gaug, Andrew, St. Joseph News-Press


A Chillicothe, Mo., man's case and life is on the line as he looks to overturn more than four life sentences on Thursday.

All of the evidence, pain, confusion and division in the communities affected by the November 1990 murder of a Chillicothe woman will come to a climax for the third time as Mark D. Woodworth attempts to become a free man.

Scheduled for a Missouri Supreme Court hearing on Thursday at 9 a.m., Mr. Woodworth seeks freedom from prison after requesting a writ of habeas corpus that would release him from his convictions and sentence. Boone County Circuit Judge Gary Oxenhandler ruled on May 1 that state prosecutors failed to turn over key evidence to Mr. Woodworth's lawyers and overlooked numerous conflicts of interest among prosecutors, judges and law enforcement members.

The case goes back to the Nov. 13, 1990, murders, when a person broke into the house of Cathy and Lyndel Robertson, located outside the city limits of Chillicothe, at about midnight. Entering the couple's bedroom, the suspect shot and killed Ms. Robertson, while Mr. Robertson survived with bullet wounds through his mouth, cheek, neck and shoulder.

Mr. Woodworth, the son of a man who farmed with Mr. Robertson, was accused of taking his father's gun, stealing bullets from his neighbor's family shed and using them to kill Ms. Robertson.

Convicted of murder in 1995 and in a re-trial in 1999, Mr. Woodworth is basing his request for freedom on alleged shady communication by state prosecutors, including Kenny Hulshof, who went on to become a U.S. representative. Mr. Woodworth alleges that the prosecutors failed to provide his previous attorneys with copies of letters between a Livingston County judge, state and local prosecutors, and Lyndel Robertson that cast doubt on Woodworth's guilt.

Mr. Woodworth's attorneys allege that a former county sheriff allowed a private investigator hired by Mr. Robertson to "inexcusably' lead the murder inquiry, and said the judge who oversaw grand jury proceedings acted like a prosecutor rather than an impartial arbiter. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Murder Case Goes to Missouri Supreme Court
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.